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Thyroid Cancer Fastest-growing Cancer in America

Thyroid Cancer is the Fastest-Growing Cancer in America

Nearly three out of four cases of thyroid cancer are found in women.
Although the death rate from cancer in America is down 25 percent since 1991, there is one type of cancer rapidly increasing in the U.S. According to the American Cancer Society, the chance of being diagnosed with thyroid cancer has tripled over the last three decades, making it the fastest-growing cancer.
The thyroid is a gland located in the front of the neck, shaped like a butterfly. It produces hormones that enter the bloodstream and affect the metabolism, heart, brain, muscles and liver, and keep the body functioning properly and effectively.

The estimates for cases of thyroid cancer in America for 2017 have increased, and rates are higher in women than men, according to these figures published on cancer.org.
In 2017, there will be an estimated 56,870 new cases of thyroid cancer  — 42,470 in women and 14,400 in men.
An estimated 2,010 deaths will result from thyroid cancer  — 1,090 in women and 920 in men.
Women account for nearly three-quarters of thyroid cancer cases. The exact cause of most thyroid cancers is unknown. Research has concluded that better imaging technology has increased the number of thyroid cancer cases diagnosed. 
“Much of this rise appears to be the result of the increased use of thyroid ultrasound, which can detect small thyroid nodules that might not otherwise have been found in the past,” the American Cancer Society says.
What are the signs or symptoms related to thyroid cancer? The American Cancer Society lists the following on cancer.org:
A lump in the neck, sometimes growing quickly
Swelling in the neck
Pain in the front of the neck, sometimes going up to the ears
Hoarseness or other voice changes that do not go away
Trouble swallowing
Trouble breathing
A constant cough that is not due to a cold
Talk with your doctor immediately if you have any of the signs or symptoms associated with thyroid cancer. Noncancerous conditions or even other cancers can also cause many of the symptoms.
How can you protect yourself?
Experts say most people found to have thyroid cancer have no known risk factors, and so emphasize that most cases can not be prevented. Professionals suggest regular self-exams to catch thyroid changes in the earliest stages as one of the best means of protection.
Here are five steps to performing a self-exam from thyroidawareness.com:
Hold a mirror in your hand, focusing on the lower front area of your neck, above the collarbones and below the voice box (larynx).
While focusing on this area in the mirror, tip your head back.
Take a drink of water and swallow.
As you swallow, look at your neck. Check for any bulges or protrusions in this area when you swallow. Reminder: Don’t confuse the Adam’s apple with the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland is located farther down the neck, closer to the collarbone. You may want to repeat this process several times.
If you see any bulges or protrusions in this area, see your physician. You may have an enlarged thyroid gland or a thyroid nodule that should be checked to determine whether further evaluation is needed.
Health professionals estimate that 15 million Americans have undiagnosed thyroid problems. The good news is that the survival rate of thyroid cancer patients is higher than for most other cancers. Early detection of thyroid cancer can open up more treatment options. You can also ask your doctor to check your thyroid health with a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test, a blood test that can determine whether the gland is functioning normally.
AARP

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The Bipolar Disorder We Don’t talke about.

August 29, 2016
According to Sexual Health Matters, hypersexuality is found among an estimated 25 to 80 percent of all bipolar patients experiencing mania. That’s not trivial or an insignificant number. There are approximately 5.7 million adult Americans, or about 2.6 percent of the U.S. population age 18 and older, who live with bipolar disorder.
With that statistic, we can presume millions of people likely live with it. This symptom can be one of the most destructive and devastating. Yet, many people don’t realize they have it or that it has a name. While the symptoms of bipolar disorder are highly characterized, there seems to be little discussion on this particular topic. Why is that?
With Suzy Favor Hamilton’s latest book ”Fast Girl: A Life Spent Running from Madness” out in bookstores across the country, there has been an increased amount of discussion regarding bipolar mania. More specifically, its focus on the symptom of hypersexuality.
She writes in her book, “Being bipolar means being insatiable. The high of the mania is never high enough. There is always a desire, a need, to push the high to the next level, in the same way a drug addict constantly requires more and stronger drugs. For a person with bipolar disorder, risky behavior can be the best drug of all.”
Related Stories
The Symptom of Bipolar Disorder We Don’t Talk About
14 Secrets of People Who’ve Experienced Hypersexuality
Robert Weiss, Founding Director of The Sexual Recovery Institute, Los Angeles and Director of Sexual Disorders Services at The Ranch Treatment Center explained in a piece on PsychCentral, “Sexual addiction or hypersexuality is defined as a dysfunctional preoccupation with sexual fantasy, often in combination with the obsessive pursuit of casual or non-intimate sex: pornography, compulsive masturbation, romantic intensity and objectified partner sex for a period of at least six months.”
Hypersexuality is, from my personal experience, an overwhelming compulsion and addiction to sex and sexual content. When I’m hypersexual, I get intense cravings for sex. It’s similar to the sort of “butterflies in your stomach” feeling when you fall in love. It’s an intense high that gives me a massive boost in self-confidence. The temptation to act out is so strong I can practically feel it on my skin and taste it on my tongue. The worst part about hypersexuality is I’m never satisfied. I have to actively resist what my body is essentially trying to do on autopilot. If I’m not careful, then I’ll do something I’ll regret.

MIGHTY PARTNER RESOURCES
Wellness for depression and bipolar disorder
Get education on depression and bipolar disorder
Peer support groups
via Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

As a writer for them, I encourage you to look at bpHope Magazine for more insightful information on the topic. They are a fantastic resource when it comes to articles and expert advice on what the symptoms look like, as well as professional opinions from leading experts in bipolar disorder. With being happily married to a wonderful husband, this kind of symptom tends to get me in serious trouble. Last year, I had a terribly bad manic episode that lasted several months.
During that time, I lost complete control of myself and acted out sexually. The worst part was nothing was ever enough. I needed more and more. Nothing would satiate me. It took over my entire brain and wouldn’t let go until the mania finally died. Despite the fact that I fought fervently against my overwhelming urges, I still was constantly unable to stop myself from falling into temptation.
Now that the clouds have parted and the dust has settled, I can think clearly and work around the triggers that caused me to lose control. My husband and I educated ourselves thoroughly on hypersexuality and he has now forgiven me for my actions. Whereas I was and am still responsible for all actions I take, I understand now that my behavior was a symptom of an illness, a common symptom of bipolar mania. Armed with this information, he, my best friends and my healthcare professionals have all agreed on a strategic prevention plan to help minimize my triggers and prevent any future mistakes.
Related Stories
Why I Rarely Tell People I Have Bipolar Disorder
23 Things About Bipolar Disorder Nobody Talks About
Although I do feel guilty every day for what I did, I no longer feel ashamed of myself. What happened was a terrible mistake but I’ve learned considerable information from it. With knowledge comes power, and I’m trying every single day to bring that power back into my own hands. Hopefully, I’ll regain it fully one day.
Don’t be ashamed of your actions. Learn from them and grow. If you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of hypersexuality, or any other symptoms of mania, then please contact your doctor.
Image via Thinkstock.
This post originally appeared on The Huffington Post.

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Ataxia

Ataxia is an autosomal recessive type of hereditary neuromuscular syndrome, includes slow degenerative changes of the spinal cord, peripheral nerves and the brain. Dysfunction of the central nervous system affects coordination of the muscles in the limbs.

Some symptoms could be an awkward, uncoordinated walk accompanied often by poor hand coordination and abnormal speech, eye movement and double vision, sensory loss and cognitive impairment.

Vision disorders: optic atrophy, retinitis, pigmentosa and eye movement paralysis.

Heart: Heart disease, breathing problems, bone abnormalitieies and diabetes

slurred speech.

Although there is no permanent cure there is a times when you can be in remission for periods of time. and comfort measures.

.

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What Cancers are caused by Alcohol!

It’s true that several types of cancer are caused by drinking alcohol.  The health effects of drinking alcohol have been thoroughly researched and documented. While most people associate long-term alcohol use with liver problems, many are surprised that it is related to other chronic conditions, such as dementia, pancreatitis and even several types of cancer.
Liver, throat and esophageal cancer have the clearest association with chronic, long-term alcohol use, but other cancers have been indicated in studies as well. Tobacco use, combined with alcohol, greatly increases the risk of some cancers; the combination is a “perfect storm,” especially in cancers that affect the upper digestive tract (esophageal and throat cancer).
In general, the more alcohol you drink the greater your risk, so even cutting down a bit can help.  Overall it’s felt that alcohol is the cause of 3.5% of cancers in the United States.  Given that 1 in 2 men and 1 in 3 women are expected to develop cancer over their lifetime, that’s not a small number.
1
Liver Cancer

The association between liver cancer and alcohol consumption has been thoroughly researched and documented. Long-term, excessive drinking is a major risk factor for cirrhosis, a condition marked by scarring and inflammation of the liver. Over time, healthy tissue is replaced by scar tissue, impeding the liver’s ability to properly function. Having cirrhosis greatly increases your risk of developing liver cancer.  Check out these other causes of liver cancer to find ways to lower your risk.

2
Breast Cancer
Many women are surprised to learn that a few drinks a week may increase their risk of breast cancer. Alcohol affects estrogen levels by changing the way the body metabolizes them. Estrogen levels are clearly linked to breast cancer development. The risk increases with the amount of alcohol consumed. Women who drink moderately or excessively on a regular basis face the most risk.

3
Oral Cancer
Those who consume alcohol are six times more likely to develop oral cancer than those who don’t. Research shows that over 75 percent of people with oral cancer are drinkers. Additionally, those who drink and smoke are at an even higher risk of developing the disease.  Check out some other risk factors for oral cancer, as well as signs and symptoms to watch for if you’ve ever imbibed.

4
Throat Cancer
Throat cancer is a type of cancer that develops in the pharynx and other structures of the throat. Research tells us that chronic alcohol consumption is associated with throat cancer development, but when combined with tobacco, the risk of developing the disease drastically increases.  Check out this list of cancers caused by smoking, and if you smoke and drink, talk to someone about quitting today.
5
Esophageal Cancer
Esophageal cancer develops in the esophagus, a long tube that connects your mouth to your stomach. It has been estimated that about 75 percent of esophageal cancer cases are related to chronic alcohol consumption. The type of esophageal cancer most people who drink excessively develop is usually squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus.  This is in contrast to esophageal adenocarcinoma which often occurs in response to chronic reflux.
6
Laryngeal Cancer
Laryngeal cancer is a type of throat cancer (see above) that affects the larynx or “voice box” – an organ that plays an important role in breathing and communicating. It contains the vocal cords, which give us the sound needed to speak. While tobacco is the prime risk factor in most cases of laryngeal cancer, alcohol, in conjunction with tobacco use, greatly increases the risk. Studies have shown that alcohol enhances (or increases) the carcinogenic effect of tobacco.
7
Colon and Rectal Cancer
Several studies have linked colon cancer to heavy, long-term use of alcohol. According to the American Cancer Society, male drinkers generally have a higher risk than women drinkers, but both are at an increased risk in comparison to nondrinkers.
If you are a heavy drinker, you can greatly reduce your risk of colon cancer and other types of cancer by avoiding alcohol or reducing the amount you consume. If you are an alcoholic, your doctor may recommend that you have a ​colonoscopy earlier than the recommended age to detect any precancerous polyps or cancerous growths.
Sources:
American Cancer Society. Alcohol Use and Cancer. Updated 02/12/14. http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/dietandphysicalactivity/alcohol-use-and-cancer
National Cancer Institute. Alcohol and Cancer Risk. Updated 06/24/13. http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/alcohol/alcohol-fact-sheet

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