All posts by Kgregory

Happy Friday !!!!!

After reading the past articles, I feel like I have everything the New Jersey Functional Neurology Center helps patients with.    I had no idea nor has any Dr in Reno, CA, Salt Lake City mentioned this center is available.  It’s amazing to me how ego’s set in and If they can’t cure you no one can.  I have not been to the Center but after reading the web page, and having a few short e mails with the DR, I feel like there is hope for all of us out there.  Dr Scopelliti  offers hope for all different area’s and I feel lucky to have found him.  Now he is stuck with me!   You can sign up for e mails at the bottom of the article, but I also will be sharing his information he has offered to help others out there  living the world of Invisible Illness’s.

www.dcneuro.net

Have a wonderful Friday !!!!

Kelly

The intent of this site is to help others through sharing information.  Kelly Helsel does not endorse or intend to mislead any readers as to the content of any articles or books on this site.

 

 

 

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New Jersey Functional Neurology Center with Dr Scopelliti

Brain Based Neurology

Brain Based Neurology

Treatment For Patients Suffering With Vertigo, Dizziness, Imbalance, Dystonia, Traumatic Brain Injury/Concussion, (TBI), ADD ADHD and other Neurologic and Neurobehavioral Disorders

Vertigo, although most commonly associated with inner ear disorders, has several causes including both vestibular, (inner ear), as well as central, (brain based).  Dizziness and dysequilibrium, (imbalance), are often seen as secondary effects of vertigo as well, associated with subtle changes in the brain, which we see in those afflicted with vertigo and dizziness.  Relief of vertigo symptoms depends on determining and eliminating the cause. Vertigo, dizziness and imbalance may be caused by a more serious condition that many health care providers can miss since they don’t treat neurologic and/or vestibular conditions on a day-to-day basis.  In the past, the standard medical treatment for symptoms of dizziness was the prescription of certain vestibular suppressant medications, such as Meclizine.  In the last ten years, the understanding of brain function has exploded.  The nineties have been referred to as “The Decade of the Brain.”  Brain based understanding as well as understanding of vestibular dysfunction, (vertigo and dizziness, presyncope, etc), has yielded extensive new therapies and treatments for resultant conditions, such as vertigo and dizziness, dystonia, as well as a multitude of behavioral disorders, such as attention deficit disorder, (ADD ADHD), dyslexia, etc.  It is now known that brain/vestibular dysfunction is is also intimately related to many conditions, including learning disabilities such as ADD ADHD, phobias, panic attacks and anxiety, scoliosis, movement disorders, including dystonia, Parkinson’s, Mild Cognitive Impairment, essential tremors, etc., and brain injury, (TBI, MTBI), as well as vertigo symptoms and symptoms of dizziness, disequilibrium and other disorders of imbalance, which predispose increased and premature fall risk associated with imbalance.

The resultant development of new protocols in diagnosis and treatment primarily of brain based disorders, such as vertigo and dizziness, dystonia, etc., continue to be developed today, and many focus on accepted understanding of central control mechanisms of the brain involved in movement, balance, and postural stability.  Our unique approach to treatment incorporates functional integrative neurological and neurodevelopmental rehabilitation. Dr. Scopelliti credits his success with these more exotic neurologic and neuro-otologic conditions to his in-depth diagnosis and conservative treatment protocols which diagnose the true cause of the patient’s symptoms, (like vertigo and dizziness), then treat properly to provide as much long term relief as possible.  Our brain based treatments provide brain fitness peak performance by exploiting concepts of neuroplasticity which were concluded to be possible in the 90’s.  Neuroplasticity is a concept of neuronal regrowth and replication, which for centuries has been thought to be impossible.  We now know that it is not only possible, but that it is in fact how the brain works.

Monmouth Functional Neurology Center Video

Functional Neurology on ABC News

This recent ABC News piece examines the myriad of successes which patients have found through FunctionalNeurology.

Hope Restored –  What is Functional Neurology

Out of State Patients

Because of the high level of specialization and success of our practice, we routinely see patients from out of town and from out of state suffering with untreated complex brain based disorders such as vertigo, dizziness, dysequilibrium, dystonia and traumatic brain injury, (TBI).  If you are coming to see us from out of state, you can find a local hotel to make arrangements at by keying in the phrase “hotels in Long Branch NJ” into Google map search box, or, your favorite mapping application.  You can find the local map of our office on our Directions page.  This will bring up several local hotels and their contact information.  We typically advocate spending the week as you will be seeing the doctor daily.  Please call our office for any assistance which you may need regarding a hotel stay or transportation.

The following are representative of the types of conditions for which we routinely see patients in our office:

“Learn To Live With it” or, “Your Problem Is In Your Head” Patients

This is the vast majority of our practice, comprised of patients who have been to specialist after specialist, had lots of tests, are not getting better, and are told simply to “Learn To Live With it”  or, “Your Problem Is In Your Head”.

Imbalance And Balance Disorders

Vertigo and Dizziness, Pre-syncope, Balance Loss or Dysequilibrium, Fall Risk.

Dystonia And Movement Disorders

Dystonia, Torticollis, Ballismus, Tremors, Parkinson’s.

Traumatic Brain Injury

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, (MTBI), Post Concussive Syndrome, Seizure Disorder, any Closed Head Injury, Motor Vehicle Accident Injuries and other Accident Injuries.

Headaches

Migraine & Sick Headaches, Tension Headache, Post Traumatic Cephalgia, Cluster Headaches, Head & Face Pain, Vestibular Migraines.

Behavior Disorders Of Development, ADD ADHD

Child Neurobehavioral Disorders, Neurological Developmental Delay,  Tourette’s & Motor Tics, Learning, and Behavioral Disorders: ADD  ADHD, Autism, Asperger’s, Tourette’s, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder; OCD,  Child Coordination Disorders, Child Postural Disorders including Scoliosis, Ocular Palsies such as Lazy Eye, etc.

Most Brain Based Disorders

Stroke, (CVA), Tinnitus, Panic disorder, Vasovagal Presyncope, Seizure Disorder, Pain, Pain Syndromes, Nerve Entrapment Syndromes of Arm & Legs, Sensory Processing Disorders, Communicative Disorders, Cerebral Palsy, Seizures, Enuresis, etc.

Pain

Neck pain, mid and lower back pain, complicated with arm and/or leg pain, or, uncomplicated.

Patients Not Responding To A Care Plan

Patients who have been treating for one to two weeks and are not improving or are worsening.

Independent Evaluations Regarding Appropriateness Of Care

Patients who have been inadvertently cut off from care either by peer review or IME, which appears to be biased and not representative of the patients actual status.

Other Scenarios Such As Athletic Enhancement In Timing And Coordination

Our office is a fully established balance center focusing largely in the primary treatment of patients with vertigo, dizziness, dysequilibrium, (imbalance & fall risk), dystonia and ADD ADHD.

Use the navigation links on the right to seek out relevant content for vertigo and dizziness, dysequilibrium, imbalance and fall risk, dystonia, MTBI, headaches, and ADD ADHD.

Dr. Scopelliti is a Functional Neurologist in Monmouth County NJ.

 

 

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Formaldehyde and Neurodegenerative disease.

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015

Funeral directors may be at heightened risk of progressive neurodegenerative disease

Link with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis may be formaldehyde in embalming fluid

Funeral directors, who prepare bodies for burial, may be at heightened risk of the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS for short, as a result of the formaldehyde used in embalming fluid, suggests research published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, was the subject of last year’s ice bucket challenge. It is progressive, causing muscle weakness, paralysis, and eventually respiratory failure and death. There is no cure for the condition, which is thought to affect 450,000 people worldwide.

Some environmental factors have been mooted as possibly increasing the risk of developing ALS, including formaldehyde.

The researchers therefore looked at the links between death from ALS and occupational exposure to formaldehyde, using the US National Longitudinal Mortality Study (NLMS), involving almost 1.5 million adults.

When they were 25 or older, participants were asked about their current or most recent job. Their exposure to formaldehyde at work was estimated, using criteria developed by industrial hygienists at the National Cancer Institute.

The intensity (frequency and level) and probability (likelihood) of exposure to formaldehyde were calculated for each job and industry sector.

Men in jobs with a high probability of exposure to formaldehyde were around three times as likely to die of ALS as those who had not been exposed to this chemical at all.

But women with a high probability of exposure did not have an increased risk of ALS, possibly because too few had jobs that exposed them to high levels of formaldehyde, making it difficult to calculate risk level, say the researchers.

Men whose intensity and probability of exposure were rated as high were more than four times as likely to die of ALS as those with no exposure, although there were only two ALS deaths in this group.

All the 493 men with high intensity and probability of exposure to formaldehyde were funeral directors as were nearly all the women, none of whom died of ALS.

This gender discrepancy in death rates might be because women funeral directors in the US are more often involved in dealing with bereaved relatives than in embalming, which would limit their exposure to formaldehyde, suggest the researchers.

This is an observational study so no definitive conclusions can be drawn about cause and effect, and the authors caution that jobs involving a high level of exposure to formaldehyde are relatively rare, added to which funeral directors are exposed to other chemicals used in embalming as well as to bacteria, and prions.

But experimental research has linked formaldehyde to nerve damage, increased permeability of the energy powerhouses of cells–mitochondria–and harmful free radical production, all of which are implicated in ALS, they say.

The intent of this site is to help others through sharing information.  Kelly Helsel does not endorse or intend to mislead any readers as to the content of any articles or books on this site.

 

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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

, Research, Stanford News, Videos

“This is probably one of the last major diseases we know nothing about”: A look at CFS

“This is probably one of the last major diseases we know nothing about": A look at CFS

Chronic fatigue syndrome affects between 836,000 to 2.5 million people in the United States, and 25 percent of them are confined to their bed. Earlier this year, the Institute of Medicine released a report acknowledging that chronic fatigue syndrome is a real and serious disease and renaming the disorder “systemic exertion intolerance disease” to better reflect its key symptoms.

The current issue of Palo Alto Weekly focuses on the disease and tells the story of local resident Whitney Dafoe, a promising 31-year-old photographer whose career was cut short when he began experiencing crushing fatigue, dizziness, gastrointestinal problems and dramatic weight loss:

Dafoe’s disease has progressed to the point that he cannot talk, read or use the Internet. His joint pain became so severe some time ago that he could no longer walk and needed to use a wheel chair. Now he rarely gets out of bed. On a good day, he’ll show his gratitude by pointing to his heart, his mother said.

His parents have stuck a few brief messages he’s scrawled on notes to the door frame outside his room. The yellow squares of paper are the only way he can communicate these days.

“I don’t know what to say. I just feel pretty hopeless about all this. I never get a break from bad things,” he wrote on one note.

“It’s so hard not being able to take care of my stuff. The feeling of helplessness it gives me is so stressful,” another states.

Dafoe, who is also featured in the above video, is the son of Ronald Davis, PhD, a genetics researcher who was instrumental in the Human Genome Project and directs Stanford’s Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Research Center. A second article details how Davis and colleagues are working to better understand the debilitating disease and develop diagnostic tests and treatments:

Davis and his team plan to use technologies developed for the Human Genome Project to sequence the entire genome of chronic fatigue patients, including 1,600 mitochondrial genes, more than 20,000 other genes and control regions that regulate genes. They hope to identify proteins that are found in immune cells, blood and spinal fluid; search for infectious agents in blood, bone marrow, spinal fluid and saliva and changes to gastrointestinal tract flora; and find evidence of autoimmune responses. The research could reveal DNA sequences that are altered in chronic fatigue patients.

The detailed approach is more comprehensive than that of other research, which has only looked at a fraction of the genes, according to the center’s website.

Davis is working with numerous collaborators across many fields, hoping the collaborative effort will attract the best minds in their fields.

“This is probably one of the last major diseases we know nothing about.

This is your last chance to be a pioneer,” he said.The intent of this site is to help others through sharing information Kelly Helsel does not endorse or intend to mislead any readers as to the content of any articles or books on this site.

 

 

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Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion by Dr A.R. Scopelliti

Nov

21

TBI/traumatic brain injury

Concussion, or traumatic brain injury is common among contact sports participants. Concussion has been defined as a condition in which there is a traumatically induced alteration in mental status, with or without an associated loss of consciousness. In reviewing the scope of symptoms of actual concussion patients, further specificity can be discussed. Dizziness or vertigo is an erroneous perception of self motion or perception of environmental motion and of gravitational orientation. Most patients who have suffered a concussion experience this phenomena of symptomatology. Typically this perception is created through a mismatch between the vestibular, visual and proprioceptive, (sensation of the earth under your feet), systems. Because of the overlap of these systems, they each tend to compensate for deficiencies of the others by design. This is why when the lights suddenly go out, or you suddenly step onto a soft spongy surface such as wet sod from a hard surface such as concrete, the normal brain can quickly compensate by changing between these three systems to prevent falling. TBI does not produce a specific disease entity, rather, it causes a syndrome of mismatches of the stabilizing systems described above, in addition to headache and other symptoms. There is no evidence that medication improves recovery after concussion. Further, research has found that overuse of analgesics following injury may exacerbate concussion-related headaches or make them chronic. The most common treatment recommendations for concussion are rest. But this too has not met with satisfactory results as concussion symptoms commonly continue or worsen. An athlete who has a history of one or more concussions is at greater risk for being diagnosed with another concussion. The first ten days following a concussion appear to be the greatest risk for being diagnosed with another concussion. Second concussions are bad for several reasons. The brain has not yet recovered from the first concussion, so the damage becomes cumulative. Second impact syndromes are often the cause of fatalities in concussions, sports related, (adolescent and pro), or other causes. Although rest initially following a concussion is often advisable, it is not solely the best treatment for concussions. Our office uses the most contemporary and proactive treatment methods in the management of concussion brain injuries. We do this by directly affecting the aforementioned systems of balance for as long as these systems continue to be mismatched, there can be no recovery, and as long as these systems remain mismatched, they will perseverate the other concomitant symptoms associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury. More information on traumatic brain injury and treatment can be found on my website at www.dcneuro.net.

The intent of this site is to help others through sharing information.  Kelly Helsel does not endorse or intend to mislead any readers as to the content of any articles or books on this site.

 

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