Common questions about Chemo!

Chemotherapy or chemo is a systemic therapy in which medications destroy cancer cells in your body, Chemo may be used alone or along with other medications or therapies such as such as surgery, radiation and biological therapy to slow or stop the growth and spread of cancer, Most often Chemo is given By IV or injection, a cream, or liquid capsule or pills and can be placed through out the body, Chemo can also be given by a pump either inside or outside the body.

Chemo is usually given in cycles, Some people will have a port placed by a Doctor so you don’t have to be poked so often.

Chemo is a cocktail of two or more chemo drugs.

Chemo treatment can be for any length of time, Your Doctor will give your plan of care. Chemo can last a few hours to most of the day. Everyone is different as far as symptoms and also depends on the medications given.

If you choose to skip a session, your cancer cells can continue to grow.

Some chemo patients can continue to work throughout chemo and always remember you may be able to shorten your days.

It usually takes a few weeks after your last session before you start to get over any symptoms you may have.

Usual test run to have Chemo, Your Hemoglobin- This is the protein in red blood cells that helps carry oxygen through out your body.
White blood cell counts- Help your body fight against infections. Platelets- enable your blood to clot.

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Just because you are in the olympics does’nt mean you are healthy

The 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games are coming to a close. Did you happen to catch any of these 5 Olympians with health conditions (recently highlighted in The Mighty)? Their performances were inspiring — but their perspective on living with illness is what’s really golden.

U.S. pairs figure skater Alexa Scimeca-Knierim developed a rare, life-threatening gastrointestinal disorder that caused episodes of vomiting and severe weight loss and has been hard to diagnose. She had three abdominal surgeries and has shown her scars on Instagram.
After a long and painful recovery, Alexa was able to return to skating. “My whole outlook changed,” she told Team USA. “I was grateful to have the chance to fall instead of stressing out over falling or not. Was a fall as big of a deal as a drain getting pulled out of me? No, not at all. I was grateful.”
In PyeongChang, Alexa and her husband/skating partner, Chris Knierim, took home the bronze medal in the figure skating team competition and placed 15th in the pairs competition.

Alexa shared this photo with SELF for a video about her health problems and extraordinary road to the Olympics.

American long-track speed skater Brittany Bowe sustained a concussion when she collided with another skater in 2016. Later, after fainting multiple times, she was diagnosed with post-concussion syndrome and a lesser-known condition called “POTS” or postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. POTS can be a years-long or potentially lifelong condition, and it affects the body’s ability to control blood pressure or heart rate as it should when you stand up, which can cause dizziness, lightheadedness or fainting.
“There would be times where people I’d not seen in a while [would say], ‘Oh you look great, you look so healthy…’ And I’m just dying inside because I know my head isn’t on my shoulders where it normally sits,” Brittany said in a video she shared on Instagram. (Her comments reminds us of what many patients with invisible illness hear from “the normals”: “But you look so good!”). She received specialized care and coaching for people with POTS and was able to qualify for the 2018 Olympics.
Canadian snowboarder Spencer O’Brien started feeling serious joint pain and stiffness in late 2012, and she originally attributed it to normal wear and tear from her sport. It took until 2014 to get the right diagnosis (rheumatoid arthritis) — and she went through bouts of depression before finding out what was wrong.
“A big lesson I learned during that experience was to be an advocate for my health,” Spencer told The Inertia. “I think our intuition is so strong, like I knew something was wrong with me beyond the injuries, and I did voice that, but we ran a number of tests, which came back clean.” She had to push for additional tests, which pointed to RA and helped her get on the right track with her treatments so she could continue her sport.
U.S. cross-country skier Kris Freeman was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2000 (at age 19) after a routine blood test run by a U.S. ski team physiologist. PyeongChang was his fourth Olympics appearance. During the 2006 Olympic Games, The New York Times profiled Freeman and his unique treatment/training regimen. (Little known fact: Insulin is on the anti-doping list, and athletes who need it for medical treatment, like Kris, have to apply for a waiver — “one more hurdle that comes with managing diabetes,” The Times noted.)
“The last few years have been tough with some pretty public setbacks with my diabetes,” Kris told Lilly Diabetes (he’s a speaker at their diabetes summer camps for kids). “But, I’ve been able to stay positive and maintain my nutrition and overall diabetes management, which has helped me tremendously. I want to show everyone, especially children, that they can and should keep reaching for their dreams.”
Marc Oliveras, an alpine skier from Andorra, was diagnosed with lupus (SLE) in 2014 and took a break from his sport so he could treat the autoimmune disorder, which was affecting his skin, kidneys and blood. “After a long recovery and a difficult summer, where I had to start first knowing the unknown [my disease], being able to compete is already a reward,” he said in his athlete profile.
It’s worth reading The Mighty’s article to the end, because the author reminds people living with health conditions that everyone’s illness and situation is different: some people may have milder forms of a disease, respond better to treatment, or have better access to world-class care.
Also, the media tend to share a boiled-down or glossed-over features on athletes triumphantly “overcoming” their condition, rather than showing the everyday challenges or realities of managing their condition while training for their sport. Fortunately, athletes like the ones above are raising awareness: they’ve lived, breathed and trained with their condition, and they feel grateful to even be able to compete. That kind of perspective is pure gold.
Patients like me.

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Types of Weight Loss Procedures that can save your life.

Weight loss although has risks, can be a benefits including curing diabetes, lowering blood pressure, lowering cholesterol, easy joints and arthritis pain, digestive issues. Asthma and lung disease, sleep apnea, pre diabetes, Hepatic Steatosis, non alcohol related cirrhosis, PCOS for infertility, Joint disease, pseudotumor cerebri, uniary incontinense, venous stasis disease which causes swelling and varicose veins, Depression and mental illness, Quality of life. Longer life.
LAGB:
The Lap Band, adjustable Banding System. Placement of a flexible silicone band around the upper part of the stomach. the result is your not as hungry, feels fuller faster and eats less. there is a port left under the skin, so the Doctor can tighten the band or make it looser.

LRYGB, Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric Bypass, t in involves the creation of a small capacity stomach pouch and a small outlet from the pouch directly into the small intestine, where nutrients are absorbed. The pouch will hold less then the previous stomach, can fee satisfied sooner, eats, Hormonal issues make a difference in your calories being burned.

LSG, Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, This removes a large portion of the stomach, the remaining portion of the stomach is formed into a long tube that is unable to enlarge or balloon up with food. The restriction reduces the amount a person can eat and causes satiety with less food.

MGB, Mini-Gastric Bypass or loop Gastric Bypass is a laparoscopic gastric bypass the involves connecting a loop of the small intestine to a small stomach ouch, creating the same sense of satiety and reduced hunger This procedure tissue connection instead of two and can be performed out patient.

The Duodenal Switch, This procedure involves a more complex re-routing of the intestines, that results in reduced stomach capacity and reduced nutrient absorption, It is the most invasive of the procedures and has the most risks but it may still have a role as a revisional procedure of for people with severe diabetes and very high BM!.

Band with imbringcation, This procedure which adds an imbrication or surgical in -folding and tightening of the stomach, to the placement of any adjustable gastric band. this is also out patient procedure it may improve weight loss produce faster results over LAGB Alone.

The laparoscopic improvement allow surgeons to spend less time in operating room and usually can go home that day.

In order the Qualify you must have a approval from a bariatric surgeon, the surgery center, BMI over 55. No history of Pulmonary hypertension, anesthia approval, sleep apnea under control
If you are over 65 most likely you won’t qualify.
You may want to keep your decision to have bariatric surgery to your self, the last thing you need is others opinions, it just between you and your Dr. You can even go under another name in the hospital to protect your privacy, but if you want to share your decision, make sure its with positive people that will support you in your journey and help you in your recovery.

A fantastic Book to read which gives you the in’s and outs, pro’s and con’s to any Gastric surgery. It is called A Sasse Guide, Outpatient Weight loss surgery, Dr Sasse is a highly experienced and accomplished bariatric surgeon, author expert and featured speaker national in the field of Weight reduction, bariatric medicine, remission of diabetes and surgery.

I have met him personally and just felt comfortable with his knowledge, He has refused patients because they don’t qualify, which I think is good, instead of just making the money. His office staff is incredible, kind and not judgmental. You can order the book off Amazon.com
If you would like to contact his office for their information conferences or a consultation the phone number is 775-7999. He resides in Reno, NV

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The simple things you use to be able to eat, you can’t eat anylonger and the list gets bigger and bigger!

When you have a invisible illness, so many things change in your life, your smells, taste, what your stomach can handle, see how long you can keep it down or in. I notice the further my disease continues the more I can’t eat, sugar forget, I use to be a chocoholic, loved wine, cheese, fruit, vegetables salads and now its ensure, they recently came out with a low sugar one so it doesn’t hurt me, but its not easy I can only take a sip a hour or I throw up. Smells make me throw up I can’t even been in a room with food. perfumes bother me, textures, materials, simple things. Things we take for granite every day! all of a sudden is taken away from your life, piece by piece.

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We are going to carry you!!!!! Inspiration Story

We are going to carry you’: Students bring teacher to tears after the Florida shooting.
Marissa Schimmoeller teaches English at a high school in Ohio. She also happens to use a wheelchair.
As you may expect, Schimmoeller was on edge returning to work after the horrifying shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Florida. “As the first students walked in, I began to feel the anxiety pooling in my stomach,” she recollected from those first tense moments starting a new day.

But Schimmoeller was dreading one question specifically because she uses a wheelchair: “Mrs. Schimmoeller, what will we do if a shooter comes in your room?
inevitably, the question was asked.
“My stomach sank,” Schimmoeller wrote in a Facebook post on Feb. 15. “I launched into my pre-planned speech about our plan of action.”
But then came the more difficult part of her answer, she noted — the part she’d especially been dreading.
“I want you to know that I care deeply about each and every one of you and that I will do everything I can to protect you,” she assured them. “But, being in a wheelchair, I will not be able to protect you the way an able-bodied teacher will.”
She continued: “If there is a chance for you to escape, I want you to go. Do not worry about me. Your safety is my number one priority.”
That’s when her students brought her to tears.
“Slowly, quietly, as the words I had said sunk in, another student raised their hand,” the teacher wrote in her post. “She said, ‘Mrs. Schimmoeller, we already talked about it. If anything happens, we are going to carry you.'”
“I lost it,” Schimmoeller concluded in her post, which has amassed more than 33,000 likes and nearly 19,000 shares as of publication.
“With tears in my eyes as I type this, I want my friends and family to know that I understand that it is hard to find the good in the world, especially after a tragedy like the one that we have watched unfold, but there is good. True goodness. It was found in the hearts of my students toda
Schimmoeller’s big-hearted students are truly good. They’re incredibly thoughtful. They care.

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The Great inventions We Got from Wrong-Headed Treatments

The VIBRATOR INVENTED BY JOSEPH Mortimer Granyville for men to relax there muscles for men in the 1880s, it was quickly adopted for the use of women for a condition called hysteria. The electrical device relieved Doctors of cramping for manually stimulating a women’s clitoris, thus the Vibrator was born known as the Granville’s Hammer.

The Graham cracker, the original bland unsweetened cracker developed by Presbyterian minister Sylvester Graham as a alternative to the sugary crackers he believed were leading children to dangerous self abuse “masturbation” Nabisco turned the tables sweetening them into s’mores-supporters know and love today.

corn flakes was created by Dr. Harvey Kellogg created in a sanitarium to curb the devil of Masturbation, Harvey’s Kellogg added sugar to the cereal causing a riff in the family, Dr Kellogg girls that were troublesome sexual desire could be curbed by burning lady parts with cabolic acid.

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Supporting people with invisible illnesses