What is Alopecia Areata?

Questions and Answers about Alopecia Areata

This publication contains general information about alopecia areata (al-oh-PEE-shah ar-ee-AH-tah). It describes what alopecia areata is, its causes, and treatment options. Information is also provided on current research. At the end is a list of key words to help you understand the terms in this publication. If you have further questions after reading this publication, you may wish to discuss them with your doctor.

Alopecia areata is just one cause of alopecia, or hair loss. This publication deals only with alopecia areata.

What Is Alopecia Areata?

Alopecia areata is considered an autoimmune disease, in which the immune system, which is designed to protect the body from foreign invaders such as viruses and bacteria, mistakenly attacks the hair follicles, the structures from which hairs grow. This can lead to hair loss on the scalp and elsewhere.

In most cases, hair falls out in small, round patches about the size of a quarter. In many cases, the disease does not extend beyond a few bare patches. In some people, hair loss is more extensive. Although uncommon, the disease can progress to cause total loss of hair on the scalp (referred to as alopecia areata totalis) or complete loss of hair on the scalp, face, and body (alopecia areata universalis).

What Causes It?

In alopecia areata, immune system cells called white blood cells attack the rapidly growing cells in the hair follicles. The affected hair follicles become small and drastically slow down hair production. Fortunately, the stem cells that continuously supply the follicle with new cells do not seem to be targeted. So the follicle always has the potential to regrow hair.

Scientists do not know exactly why the hair follicles undergo these changes, but they suspect that a combination of genes may predispose some people to the disease. In those who are genetically predisposed, some type of trigger—perhaps a virus or something in the person’s environment—brings on the attack against the hair follicles.

Who Is Most Likely to Get It?

Alopecia areata affects nearly 2 percent of Americans of both sexes and of all ages and ethnic backgrounds. It often begins in childhood.

If you have a close family member with the disease, your risk of developing it is slightly increased. If your family member lost his or her first patch of hair before age 30, the risk to other family members is greater. Overall, one in five people with the disease has a family member who has it as well.

Is My Hair Loss a Symptom of a Serious Disease?

Alopecia areata is not a life-threatening disease. It does not cause any physical pain, and people with the condition are generally healthy otherwise. But for most people, a disease that unpredictably affects their appearance the way alopecia areata does is a serious matter.

The effects of alopecia areata are primarily socially and emotionally disturbing. In alopecia universalis, however, loss of eyelashes and eyebrows and hair in the nose and ears can make the person more vulnerable to dust, germs, and foreign particles entering the eyes, nose, and ears.

Alopecia areata often occurs in people whose family members have other autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, pernicious anemia, or Addison’s disease. People who have alopecia areata do not usually have other autoimmune diseases, but they do have a higher occurrence of thyroid disease, atopic eczema, nasal allergies, and asthma.

Can I Pass It On to My Children?

It is possible for alopecia areata to be inherited. However, most children with alopecia areata do not have a parent with the disease, and the vast majority of parents with alopecia areata do not pass it along to their children.

Alopecia areata is not like some genetic diseases in which a child has a 50–50 chance of developing the disease if one parent has it. Scientists believe that there may be a number of genes that predispose certain people to the disease. It is highly unlikely that a child would inherit all of the genes needed to predispose him or her to the disease.

Even with the right (or wrong) combination of genes, alopecia areata is not a certainty. In identical twins, who share all of the same genes, the concordance rate is only 55 percent. In other words, if one twin has the disease, there is only a 55-percent chance that the other twin will have it as well. This shows that other factors besides genetics are required to trigger the disease.

To learn more about the genes and other factors involved in alopecia areata risk, the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) sponsored the development of an alopecia areata registry. (For more information about the registry, see “What Research Is Being Conducted on Alopecia Areata?”)

Will My Hair Ever Grow Back?

There is every chance that your hair will regrow with or without treatment, but it may also fall out again. No one can predict when it might regrow or fall out. The course of the disease varies from person to person. Some people lose just a few patches of hair, then the hair regrows, and the condition never recurs. Other people continue to lose and regrow hair for many years. A few lose all the hair on the scalp; some lose all the hair on the scalp, face, and body. Even in those who lose all their hair, the possibility for full regrowth remains.

In some, the initial hair regrowth is white, with a gradual return of the original hair color. In most, the regrown hair is ultimately the same color and texture as the original hair.

What Can I Expect Next?

The course of alopecia areata is highly unpredictable, and the uncertainty of what will happen next is probably the most difficult and frustrating aspect of the disease. You may continue to lose hair, or your hair loss may stop. The hair you have lost may or may not grow back, and you may or may not continue to develop new bare patches.

How Is It Treated?

Although there is neither a cure for alopecia areata nor drugs approved for its treatment, some people find that medications approved for other purposes can help hair grow back, at least temporarily. Keep in mind that although these treatments may promote hair growth, none of them prevent new patches or actually cure the underlying disease. Consult your health care professional about the best option for you. A combination of treatments may work best. Ask how long the treatment may last, how long it will take before you see results, and about the possible side effects.

In addition to treatments to help hair grow, there are measures that can be taken to minimize the effects of excessive sun exposure or discomforts of lost hair.

  • Sunscreens are important for the scalp, face, and all exposed areas.
  • Eyeglasses (or sunglasses) protect the eyes from excessive sun and from dust and debris when eyebrows or eyelashes are missing.
  • Wigs, caps, or scarves protect the scalp from the sun and keep the head warm.
  • An ointment applied inside the nostrils keeps them moisturized and helps to protect against organisms invading the nose when nostril hair is missing.

How Will Alopecia Areata Affect My Life?

This is a common question, particularly for children, teens, and young adults who are beginning to form lifelong goals and who may live with the effects of alopecia areata for many years. The comforting news is that alopecia areata is not a painful disease and does not make people feel sick physically. It is not contagious, and people who have the disease are generally healthy otherwise. It does not reduce life expectancy and it should not interfere with going to school, playing sports and exercising, pursuing any career, working, marrying, and raising a family.

The emotional aspects of living with hair loss, however, can be challenging. Many people cope by learning as much as they can about the disease, speaking with others who are facing the same problem, and, if necessary, seeking counseling to help build a positive self-image.

How Can I Cope With the Effects of This Disease?

Living with hair loss can be difficult, especially in a culture that views hair as a sign of youth and good health. Even so, most people with alopecia areata are well-adjusted, contented people living full lives.

The key to coping is valuing yourself for who you are, not for how much hair you have or don’t have. Many people learning to cope with alopecia areata find it helpful to talk with other people who are dealing with the same problems. Nearly 2 percent of Americans have this disease at some point in their lives, so you are not alone. If you would like to be in touch with others with the disease, the National Alopecia Areata Foundation (NAAF) can help through its pen pal program, message boards, annual conference, and support groups that meet in various locations nationwide. To find contact information for NAAF and other organizations that can help people with alopecia areata, see “Where Can People Find More Information About Alopecia Areata?”

Another way to cope with the disease is to minimize its effects on your appearance. If you have extensive hair loss, a wig or hairpiece can look natural and stylish. For small patches of hair loss, a hair-colored powder, cream, or crayon applied to the scalp can make hair loss less obvious by eliminating the contrast between the hair and the scalp. Skillfully applied eyebrow pencil can mask missing eyebrows.

Children with alopecia areata may prefer to wear bandanas or caps. There are many styles available to suit a child’s interest and mood. It is often helpful if a parent informs teachers, coaches, and others that the child has alopecia areata, that it is not contagious, and that the child is healthy.

For women, attractive scarves can hide patchy hair loss, and proper makeup can camouflage the effects of lost facial hair. If you would like to learn more about camouflaging the cosmetic aspects of alopecia areata, ask your doctor or members of your local support group to recommend a cosmetologist who specializes in working with people whose appearance is affected by medical conditions.

What Research Is Being Conducted on Alopecia Areata?

Although a cure is not imminent, researchers are making headway toward a better understanding of the disease. This increased understanding will likely lead the way to better treatments for alopecia areata and eventually a way to cure it or even prevent it.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other organizations support research into the disease and its treatment. Here are some promising areas of research:

  • Developing animal models. This is a critical step toward understanding any disease, and much progress has been made. By studying mice with problems similar to those encountered in human alopecia areata, researchers hope to learn more about the mechanism of the disease and eventually develop treatments for the disease in people.
  • Studying hair follicle development. By studying how hair follicles form, develop, and cycle through growth and resting phases, researchers hope to gain a better understanding of hair growth cycle biology that may lead to treatments for the underlying disease process.
  • Understanding stem cell biology. Epithelial stem cells are immature cells that are responsible for regenerating and maintaining a variety of tissues, including the skin and the hair follicles. Stem cells in the follicle appear to be spared from injury in alopecia areata, which may explain why the potential for regrowth is always there in people with the disease. By studying the biology of these cells, scientists hope to gain a better understanding of factors that trigger the disease.
  • Finding genes. Scientists have identified genetic variations associated with the development of alopecia areata. They also discovered that alopecia areata has genetic similarities to other autoimmune diseases, namely type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease. An understanding of the genetics of the disorder will aid in disease prevention, early intervention, and development of specific therapies. To assist researchers searching for such genetic clues, the NIAMS supported the development of the National Alopecia Areata Registry, a network of five centers, to identify and register patients with the disease and collect information and blood samples (which contain genes). Data, including genetic information, is made available to researchers studying the genetic basis and other aspects of the disease and disease risk. For more information, log onto the registry website at www.AlopeciaAreataRegistry.org.

More information on research is available from the following resources:

  • NIH Clinical Research Trials and You helps people learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and how to participate. Visitors to the website will find information about the basics of participating in a clinical trial, first-hand stories from actual clinical trial volunteers, explanations from researchers, and links to how to search for a trial or enroll in a research-matching program.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov offers up-to-date information for locating federally and privately supported clinical trials for a wide range of diseases and conditions.
  • NIH RePORTER is an electronic tool that allows users to search a repository of both intramural and extramural NIH-funded research projects from the past 25 years and access publications (since 1985) and patents resulting from NIH funding.
  • PubMed is a free service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine that lets you search millions of journal citations and abstracts in the fields of medicine, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine, the health care system, and preclinical sciences.

Where Can People Find More Information About Alopecia Areata?

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Information Clearinghouse
National Institutes of Health

1 AMS Circle
Bethesda, MD 20892-3675
Phone: 301-495-4484
Toll Free: 877-22-NIAMS (877-226-4267)
TTY: 301-565-2966
Fax: 301-718-6366
Email: NIAMSinfo@mail.nih.gov
Website: http://www.niams.nih.gov

Other Resources

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health
National Institutes of Health

Website: https://nccih.nih.gov/

National Alopecia Areata Foundation

Website: http://www.naaf.org

American Academy of Dermatology

Website: http://www.aad.org

American Hair Loss Council

Website: http://www.ahlc.org

Key Words

Addison’s disease. A condition that occurs when the adrenal glands (a pair of glands situated on top of the kidneys) fail to secrete enough corticosteroid hormones. Without treatment, the disease can be fatal.

Alopecia areata. An autoimmune, often reversible disease in which loss of hair occurs in sharply defined areas usually involving the scalp or beard, but any area of the body where hair grows can be affected.

Alopecia areata totalis. A form of alopecia areata characterized by the total loss of hair on the scalp.

Alopecia areata universalis. A form of alopecia areata in which all hair on the scalp, face, and body is lost.

Autoimmune disease. A disease that results when the immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s own tissues. Rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and type 1 diabetes are autoimmune diseases (“auto” means self).

Diabetes. A disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that is necessary to convert sugar, starches, and other food into energy.

Hair follicle. A small, narrow, tube-like structure in the skin from which hair grows.

Immune system. A complex network of specialized cells and organs that work together to defend the body against attacks by “foreign” invaders such as bacteria and viruses. In some autoimmune conditions, it appears that the immune system does not function properly and may attack the body’s own tissues by mistake.

Pernicious anemia. A potentially dangerous form of anemia, usually caused by an autoimmune process, which results in a deficiency of vitamin B-12.

Rheumatoid arthritis. An autoimmune disease that targets primarily the membrane lining the joints, leading to pain, stiffness, swelling, and joint deformity.

Systemic lupus erythematosus. A chronic autoimmune disease of the connective tissue that can attack and damage the skin, joints, blood vessels, and internal organs.

Acknowledgments

The NIAMS gratefully acknowledges the assistance of the following individuals in the preparation and review of previous versions of this publication: George Cotsarelis, M.D., University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA; Vicki Kalabokes, National Alopecia Areata Foundation, San Rafael, CA; Alan Moshell, M.D., NIAMS/NIH; and David Norris, M.D., University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO. A special acknowledgement goes to Vera Price, M.D., University of California, San Francisco, CA, for assistance in the preparation of an updated version of this publication. Mary Anne Dunkin was the original author of a previous version of this publication.

For Your Information

This publication contains information about medications used to treat the health condition discussed here. When this publication was developed, we included the most up-to-date (accurate) information available. Occasionally, new information on medication is released.

For updates and for any questions about any medications you are taking, please contact

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Toll Free: 888-INFO-FDA (888-463-6332)
Website: http://www.fda.gov

For additional information on specific medications, visit Drugs@FDA at www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/drugsatfda. Drugs@FDA is a searchable catalog of FDA-approved drug products.

For updates and questions about statistics, please contact

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics

Website: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs

This publication is not copyrighted. Readers are encouraged to duplicate and distribute as many copies as needed.

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Dental Erosion from Vomiting with chronic illnesses.

Dental Erosion: How to Protect Your Teeth From Acid-Damage

Dental erosion is a form of tooth wear – where enamel and then dentin is worn down (the other forms, abrasion and attrition are discussed here). It is defined as irreversible damage to the teeth caused from chemicals (usually acids).

This acid can come from outside sources (e.g. food and drink) or from inside the body; these are explained below.

 

Dental erosion image showing worn teeth from acid damage

 

Common Causes of Erosive Damage

1. Outside Sources of Acids:

Acid is present in lots of foods and drinks, e.g.:

Soft drinks cause erosion

  • Fruits and fruit juices, in particular citrus fruits such as oranges and lemons. Common cause in children
  • Sodas/fizzy drinks, including ‘diet’ soft drinks. A major cause!
  • ‘Sports drinks’.
  • Alcohol consumption, including wine and ‘alcopops’.
  • Pickles.
  • Vinegar.
  • Medicines such as iron supplements and chewable vitamin C.

Rarer sources include factories with acids in the air and chlorine from swimming pools.

2. Inside Sources of Acid:

The acid that causes erosion may also come from stomach fluids inside the body.  Acid reflux is where stomach fluids come up towards the throat and mouth.  It is often felt as ‘heartburn’ after eating.  There are several gastric disorders that can lead to reflux.

Vomiting will also expose the mouth to gastric acid. Frequent episodes of vomiting through illness, alcoholism or eating disorders such as bulimia can cause enamel erosion. Pregnancy may also increase the risk of damage through acid reflux and vomiting associated with morning sickness.

 

How To Prevent Damage

As with most types of dental diseases, tooth erosion can usually be prevented.  The following tips contain general advice on how to prevent the problem.  If you have damage already, you will need to pay particular attention to the causes of it, and avoid what is causing it!"Oral Hygiene Tools"

In general:

  • Reduce the overall amount of acidic food and drinks you consume. Also limit these to mealtimes only, if you do consume them. This is to reduce the amount of time that your mouth is under acid-attack each day.
  • If taking acidic drinks, best to drink them quickly, again to limit the time your mouth is under attack. Don’t whirl the drink around your mouth or hold the drink in your mouth for long. The use of a straw can help keep the acid away from the teeth better (also good for reducing risk of decay). Chilling acidic drinks also reduces the harm they do.
  • After taking an acidic food or drink; drinking milk, water or rinsing your mouth out with water (or a fluoride mouthwash) can help neutralize the acid quicker.
  • Chewing sugar-free gum after eating can have a similar effect, by increasing saliva flow which helps neutralize acids.
  • Do not brush your teeth immediately after taking acidic foods or drinks. Wait for at least 30 minutes, otherwise you will be increasing damage by brushing when tooth surfaces are ‘softer’ from the chemical attack.
  • The same advice as above applies to what to do after any vomiting episodes. In particular, rinse your mouth out after vomiting but do not brush for at least 30 minutes.
  • Brush your teeth gently twice a day using fluoride toothpaste. Some new formulations of toothpaste are available for enamel repair. Tooth mousse is similar to toothpaste, but is a little stronger. However these are not a ‘miracle’ cure for dental erosion; the key message is to eliminate whatever is causing the damage.

 

Dental Erosion Symptoms

The symptoms can vary depending on what type of tooth-wear you have, but common signs include:symptoms

  • Appearance.  The effect will depend on the type of tooth wear, but can include chipping away of the edges and increased transparency of the tips of front teeth.  The surfaces may appear smooth, rounded and ‘polished’ (see image above).
  • Sensitivity to hot and cold.  This can occur when the outer protective enamel wears away exposing the more sensitive dentine.  Sensitivity does not always occur, especially if the wear is progressing slowly.
  • Changes to your bite.
  • Fillings may stand out from the surrounding tooth surfaces- a classic diagnosis marker.
  • Gum recession and wearing down of the teeth at the gum-margin (in abrasion and abfraction).
  • Overall flattening of the teeth (with attrition).

 

Dental Erosion Treatment

If you think you have this, or some other form of tooth-wear, visit your dentist. Your dentist will help you to first identify the sources of any damage (via a risk assessment) and advise you on how to eliminate these causes.Dental drills

Treatment is not always needed, particularly if any enamel wear is minor. In this case, preventive measures are all that is needed, but these are very important.  Keep attending the dentist for check-ups and follow any advice given. Regular check-ups allow your dentist to monitor the progression of any damage and best diagnose if and when any therapy is needed.

Treatment will be needed if enamel wear has caused significant loss of the tooth structure and/or is causing problems such as sensitivity and cosmetic defects.  Any treatment will depend on the extent and position of any damage.

Treatment aims are to:

  • Repair cosmetic appearance if this has been affected.
  • Reduce sensitivity by protecting and covering the dentine.
  • Help reduce further damage from tooth-wear.

 

Treatment options may include:

  • To help treat sensitivity the dentist may place fluoride gels or varnishes and advise fluoride toothpastes and mouthwashes.
  • Repairing tooth enamel loss with white filling materials.
  • In the case of extensive damage, fixing veneers or crowns may be necessary.
  • Replace missing teeth.
  • You may need a bite guard if bruxism is also a factor.

 

If in any doubt contact your dentist.  If left untreated, tooth-wear can cause severe damage. Tooth surface loss from dental erosion and other tooth wear can be very difficult to treat

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What is Behcet’s Disease.

What Is Behçet’s Disease?

The disease was first described in 1937 by Dr. Hulusi Behçet, a dermatologist in Turkey. Behçet’s disease is now recognized as a chronic condition that causes canker sores or ulcers in the mouth and on the genitals, and inflammation in parts of the eye. In some people, the disease also results in arthritis (swollen, painful, stiff joints), skin problems, and inflammation of the digestive tract, brain, and spinal cord.

Who Gets Behçet’s Disease?

Behçet’s disease is common in the Middle East, Asia, and Japan; it is rare in the United States. In Middle Eastern and Asian countries, the disease affects more men than women. In the United States, the opposite is true. Behçet’s disease tends to develop in people in their twenties or thirties, but people of all ages can develop this disease.

What Causes Behçet’s Disease?

The exact cause of Behçet’s disease is unknown. Most symptoms of the disease are caused by inflammation of the blood vessels. Inflammation is a characteristic reaction of the body to injury or disease and is marked by four signs: swelling, redness, heat, and pain. Doctors think that an autoinflammatory reaction may cause the blood vessels to become inflamed, but they do not know what triggers this reaction. Under normal conditions, the immune system protects the body from diseases and infections by killing harmful “foreign” substances, such as germs, that enter the body. In an autoimmune reaction, the immune system mistakenly attacks and harms the body’s own tissues.

Behçet’s disease is not contagious; it is not spread from one person to another. Researchers think that two factors are important for a person to get Behçet’s disease. First, it is believed that abnormalities of the immune system make some people susceptible to the disease. Scientists think that this susceptibility may be inherited; that is, it may be due to one or more specific genes. Second, something in the environment, possibly a bacterium or virus, might trigger or activate the disease in susceptible people.

What Are the Symptoms of Behçet’s Disease?

Behçet’s disease affects each person differently. Some people have only mild symptoms, such as canker sores or ulcers in the mouth or on the genitals. Others have more severe signs, such as meningitis, which is an inflammation of the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. Meningitis can cause fever, a stiff neck, and headaches. More severe symptoms usually appear months or years after a person notices the first signs of Behçet’s disease. Symptoms can last for a long time or may come and go in a few weeks. Typically, symptoms appear, disappear, and then reappear. The times when a person is having symptoms are called flares. Different symptoms may occur with each flare; the problems of the disease often do not occur together. To help the doctor diagnose Behçet’s disease and monitor its course, patients may want to keep a record of which symptoms occur and when. Because many conditions mimic Behçet’s disease, doctors must observe the lesions (injuries) caused by the disorder to make an accurate diagnosis.

The five most common symptoms of Behçet’s disease are mouth sores, genital sores, other skin lesions, inflammation of parts of the eye, and arthritis.

  • Mouth sores (known as oral aphthosis [af-THO-sis] and aphthous stomatitis [AF-thus stow-muh-TIEtis]) affect almost all people with Behçet’s disease. Individual sores or ulcers are usually identical to canker sores, which are common in many people. They are often the first symptom that a person notices and may occur long before any other symptoms appear. The sores usually have a red border and several may appear at the same time. They may be painful and can make eating difficult. Mouth sores go away in 10 to 14 days but often come back. Small sores usually heal without scarring, but larger sores may scar.
  • Genital sores affect more than half of all people with Behçet’s disease and most commonly appear on the scrotum in men and vulva in women. The sores look similar to the mouth sores and may be painful. After several outbreaks, they may cause scarring.
  • Skin problems are a common symptom of Behçet’s disease. Skin sores often look red or resemble pus-filled bumps or a bruise. The sores are red and raised, and typically appear on the legs and on the upper torso. In some people, sores or lesions may appear when the skin is scratched or pricked. When doctors suspect that a person has Behçet’s disease, they may perform a pathergy test, in which they prick the skin with a small needle; 1 to 2 days after the test, people with Behçet’s disease may develop a red bump where the doctor pricked the skin. However, only half of the Behçet’s patients in Middle Eastern countries and Japan have this reaction. It is less commonly observed in patients from the United States, but if this reaction occurs, then Behçet’s disease is likely.
  • Uveitis (yoo-vee-EYE-tis) involves inflammation of the middle or back part of the eye (the uvea) including the iris, and occurs in more than half of all people with Behçet’s disease. This symptom is more common among men than women and typically begins within 2 years of the first symptoms. Eye inflammation can cause blurred vision; rarely, it causes pain and redness. Because partial loss of vision or blindness can result if the eye frequently becomes inflamed, patients should report these symptoms to their doctor immediately.
  • Arthritis, which is inflammation of the joints, occurs in more than half of all people with Behçet’s disease. Arthritis causes pain, swelling, and stiffness in the joints, especially in the knees, ankles, wrists, and elbows. Arthritis that results from Behçet’s disease usually lasts a few weeks and does not cause permanent damage to the joints.

In addition to mouth and genital sores, other skin lesions, eye inflammation, and arthritis, Behçet’s disease may also cause blood clots and inflammation in the central nervous system and digestive organs.

Blood Clots

Some people with Behçet’s disease have blood clots resulting from inflammation in the veins (thrombophlebitis [throm-bow-fluh-BEYE-tis]), usually in the legs. Symptoms include pain and tenderness in the affected area. The area may also be swollen and warm. Because thrombophlebitis can have severe complications, people should report symptoms to their doctor immediately. A few patients may experience artery problems such as aneurysms (balloon-like swelling of the artery wall).

Central Nervous System

In the United States, Behçet’s disease affects the central nervous system in an estimated one-fifth to one-quarter of people with the disease. The central nervous system includes the brain and spinal cord. Its function is to process information and coordinate thinking, behavior, sensation, and movement. Behçet’s disease can cause inflammation of the brain and the thin membrane that covers and protects the brain and spinal cord. This condition is called meningoencephalitis. People with meningoencephalitis may have fever, headache, stiff neck, and difficulty coordinating movement, and should report any of these symptoms to their doctor immediately. If this condition is left untreated, a stroke (blockage or rupture of blood vessels in the brain) can result.

Digestive Tract

Rarely, Behçet’s disease causes inflammation and ulceration (sores) throughout the digestive tract that are identical to the aphthous lesions in the mouth and genital area.

This leads to abdominal pain, diarrhea, and/or bleeding. Because these symptoms are very similar to symptoms of other diseases of the digestive tract, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, careful evaluation is essential to rule out these other diseases.

How Is Behçet’s Disease Diagnosed?

Diagnosing Behçet’s disease is very difficult because no specific test confirms it. Less than half of people initially thought to have Behçet’s disease actually have it. When a patient reports symptoms, the doctor must conduct an examination and rule out other conditions with similar symptoms. Because it may take several months or even years for all the common symptoms to appear, the diagnosis may not be made for a long time. A patient may even visit several different kinds of doctors before the diagnosis is made.

These symptoms are key to a diagnosis of Behçet’s disease:

  • Mouth sores at least three times in 12 months
  • Any two of the following symptoms: recurring genital sores, eye inflammation with loss of vision, characteristic skin lesions, or positive pathergy (skin prick test)

Besides finding these signs, the doctor must rule out other conditions with similar symptoms, such as Crohn’s disease and reactive arthritis. The doctor also may recommend that the patient see an eye specialist to identify possible complications related to eye inflammation. A dermatologist may perform a biopsy of mouth, genital, or skin lesions to help distinguish Behçet’s from other disorders.

What Kind of Doctor Treats a Person With Behçet’s Disease?

Because the disease affects different parts of the body, a patient probably will see several different doctors. It may be helpful to both the doctors and the patient for one doctor to manage the complete treatment plan. This doctor can coordinate the treatments and monitor any side effects from the various medications that the patient takes.

A rheumatologist (a doctor specializing in arthritis and other inflammatory disorders) often manages a patient’s treatment and treats joint disease. The following specialists also treat other symptoms that affect the different body systems:

  • A gynecologist, who treats genital sores in women.
  • An urologist, who treats genital sores in men and women.
  • A dermatologist, who treats genital sores in men and women and skin and mucous membrane problems.
  • An ophthalmologist, who treats eye inflammation.
  • A gastroenterologist, who treats digestive tract symptoms.
  • A hematologist, who treats disorders of the blood.
  • A neurologist, who treats central nervous system symptoms.

How Is Behçet’s Disease Treated?

Although there is no cure for Behçet’s disease, people usually can control symptoms with proper medication, rest, exercise, and a healthy lifestyle. The goal of treatment is to reduce discomfort and prevent serious complications such as disability from arthritis or blindness. The type of medicine and the length of treatment depend on the person’s symptoms and their severity. It is likely that a combination of treatments will be needed to relieve specific symptoms. Patients should tell each of their doctors about all of the medicines they are taking so that the doctors can coordinate treatment.

Topical Medicine

Topical medicine is applied directly on the sores to relieve pain and discomfort. For example, doctors prescribe rinses, gels, or ointments. Creams are used to treat skin and genital sores. The medicine usually contains corticosteroids (which reduce inflammation), other anti-inflammatory drugs, or an anesthetic, which relieves pain.

Oral Medicine

Doctors also prescribe medicines taken by mouth to reduce inflammation throughout the body, suppress the overactive immune system, and relieve symptoms. Doctors may prescribe one or more of the medicines described below to treat the various symptoms of Behçet’s disease.

  • Corticosteroids. A corticosteroid medication is prescribed to reduce pain and inflammation throughout the body for people with severe joint pain, skin sores, eye disease, or central nervous system symptoms. Patients must carefully follow the doctor’s instructions about when to take a corticosteroid and how much to take. It also is important not to stop taking the medicine suddenly, because the medicine alters the body’s production of the natural corticosteroid hormones. Long-term use of these medications can have side effects such as osteoporosis (a disease that leads to bone fragility), weight gain, delayed wound healing, persistent heartburn, and elevated blood pressure. However, these side effects are rare when they are taken at low doses for a short time. It is important that people with the disease see their doctor regularly to monitor possible side effects. Corticosteroids are useful in early stages of disease and for acute severe flares. They are of limited use for long-term management of central nervous system and serious eye complications.
  • Immunosuppressive drugs. These medicines (in addition to corticosteroids) help control an overactive immune system, which occurs in Behçet’s disease, and reduce inflammation throughout the body and lessen the number of disease flares. Doctors may use immunosuppressive drugs when a person has eye disease or central nervous system involvement. These medicines are very strong and can have serious side effects. Patients must see their doctor regularly for blood tests to detect and monitor side effects.

Doctors may prescribe other medications to reduce inflammation and treat specific manifestations of the disease.

Rest and Exercise

Although rest is important during flares, doctors usually recommend moderate exercise, such as swimming or walking, when the symptoms have improved or disappeared. Exercise can help people with Behçet’s disease keep their joints strong and flexible.

What Is the Prognosis for a Person With Behçet’s Disease?

Most people with Behçet’s disease can lead productive lives and control symptoms with proper medicine, rest, and exercise. Doctors can use many medicines to relieve pain, treat symptoms, and prevent complications. When treatment is effective, flares usually become less frequent. Many patients eventually enter a period of remission (a disappearance of symptoms). In some people, treatment does not relieve symptoms, and gradually more serious symptoms such as eye disease may occur. Serious symptoms may appear months or years after the first signs of Behçet’s disease.

What Are Researchers Trying to Learn About Behçet’s Disease?

Researchers are exploring possible genetic, bacterial, and viral causes of Behçet’s disease as well as improved drug treatment. For example, genetic studies show strong association of the gene HLA-B51 with the disease, but the exact role of this gene in the development of Behçet’s is uncertain. Researchers hope to identify genes that increase a person’s risk for developing Behçet’s disease. Studies of these genes and how they work may provide new understanding of the disease and possibly new treatments.

Researchers are also investigating factors in the environment, such as bacteria or viruses, that may trigger Behçet’s disease. They are particularly interested in whether Streptococcus, the bacterium that causes strep throat, is associated with Behçet’s disease. Many people with Behçet’s disease have had several strep infections. In addition, researchers suspect that herpes virus type 1, a virus that causes cold sores, may be associated with Behçet’s disease.

Finally, researchers are identifying other medicines to better treat Behçet’s disease. TNF inhibitors are a class of drugs that reduce joint inflammation by blocking the action of a substance called tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Although serious side effects have been reported for TNF inhibitors, they have shown some promise in treating Behçet’s disease. TNF inhibitors belong to a family of drugs called biologics, which target the immune response. Also, interferon alpha, a protein that helps fight infection, has shown promise in treating Behçet’s disease.

More information on research is available from the following resources:

  • ClinicalTrials.gov offers up-to-date information for locating federally and privately supported clinical trials for a wide range of diseases and conditions.
  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Research Trials and You was designed to help people learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and how to participate. Visitors to the website will find information about the basics of participating in a clinical trial, first-hand stories from actual clinical trial volunteers, explanations from researchers, and links to how to search for a trial or enroll in a research-matching program.
  • NIH RePORTER is an electronic tool that allows users to search a repository of both intramural and extramural NIH-funded research projects from the past 25 years and access publications (since 1985) and patents resulting from NIH funding.
  • PubMed is a free service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine that lets you search millions of journal citations and abstracts in the fields of medicine, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine, the health care system, and preclinical sciences.
  • The NIH Clinical Center is the nation’s largest hospital devoted entirely to clinical research. It is the research hospital for the NIH, and it supports clinical research done by the Institutes and Centers as well as by NIH staff.

Where Can People Find More Information About Behçet’s Disease?

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Information Clearinghouse
National Institutes of Health

1 AMS Circle
Bethesda, MD 20892-3675
Phone: 301-495-4484
Toll Free: 877-22-NIAMS (877-226-4267)
TTY: 301-565-2966
Fax: 301-718-6366
Email: NIAMSinfo@mail.nih.gov
Website: http://www.niams.nih.gov

Other Resources

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Website: http://www.nidcr.nih.gov

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Website: http://www.niddk.nih.gov

National Eye Institute

Website: http://www.nei.nih.gov

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health

Website: http://www.ninds.nih.gov

American Academy of Dermatology

Website: http://www.aad.org

American College of Rheumatology

Website: http://www.rheumatology.org

Dermatology Foundation

Website: http://www.dermatologyfoundation.org

American Behçet’s Disease Association

Website: http://www.behcets.com

American Skin Association

Website: http://www.americanskin.org

Arthritis Foundation

Website: http://www.arthritis.org

National Organization for Rare Disorders

Website: http://www.rarediseases.org

For additional contact information, visit the NIAMS website or call the NIAMS Information Clearinghouse.

Key Words

Anesthetic. Pain relief medicine that dulls feeling in the sore area. Doctors sometimes use an anesthetic to relieve pain caused by mouth and genital sores in people with Behçet’s disease.

Aneurysm. Swelling of an artery due to a weakness in its wall.

Antibody. A special protein produced by the body’s immune system that recognizes and helps fight infectious agents and other foreign substances that invade the body.

Aphthosis. Ulcers in the mouth or on the genitals. Oral or mouth aphthosis, also called aphthous stomatitis, is the most common symptom of Behçet’s disease.

Arthritis. Literally means joint inflammation. It is a general term for more than 100 of the rheumatic diseases. Arthritis causes joint swelling, pain, and stiffness. Some people with Behçet’s disease develop a form of arthritis that goes away after a few weeks or months and causes no long-term damage to the joints.

Autoimmune disease. A disease that results when the immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s own tissues.

Biologics. A class of drugs, also known as biologic response modifiers, that target the immune response.

Blood vessels. Arteries, veins, and capillaries that carry blood through the body.

Central nervous system. This body system includes the brain and spinal cord. Its functions are to process information and coordinate thinking, behavior, sensation, and movement. In some people with Behçet’s disease, blood vessels in the central nervous system become inflamed, causing headaches, stiff neck, and clumsiness.

Corticosteroids. Strong anti-inflammatory hormones that are made naturally in the body or synthetically (man-made) for use as medicine. They also are called glucocorticoids. The most commonly prescribed medicine of this type is prednisone.

Crohn’s disease. Inflammation of the small intestine or colon that causes diarrhea, cramps, and weight loss.

Digestive tract. The body system that breaks down food. The digestive tract includes the stomach, intestines, pancreas, gallbladder, and liver.

Flare. A period of time when disease symptoms reappear or become worse.

Immune system. A complex network of specialized cells and organs that work together to defend the body against attacks by “foreign” invaders such as bacteria and viruses. In some rheumatic conditions, it appears that the immune system does not function properly and may even work against the body.

Immunosuppressive drugs. Medicines that reduce the immune response and therefore may relieve some symptoms of Behçet’s disease.

Inflammation. A reaction of tissues to injury or disease, marked by four signs: swelling, redness, heat, and pain.

Meningitis. Inflammation of the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord.

Meningoencephalitis. Inflammation of the membranes that cover and protect the brain and spinal cord. This condition sometimes occurs in patients with Behçet’s disease.

Pathergy (a state of heightened reactivity). A test that detects pathergic skin sensitivity is sometimes used to help diagnose Behçet’s disease. The skin is pricked with a small needle and in some people, a bump appears after 1 or 2 days. This reaction is called positive pathergy.

Reactive arthritis. A form of arthritis that can develop after an intestinal or urinary tract infection. The disease causes pain and swelling around the joints and in the spine. People with the disease may also experience swelling of the eye and the reproductive and urinary tracts.

Streptococcus. A bacterium that causes infections such as strep throat. Doctors think that it also may trigger Behçet’s disease in some people.

Thrombophlebitis. Inflammation of a vein and formation of a blood clot in the vein.

Topical treatment. Medicine, such as a cream or rinse, that is put directly on the affected body part.

Ulcerative colitis. Inflammation of the colon. Symptoms include stomach pain and diarrhea.

Uveitis. Inflammation of the inner eye that includes the iris, the tissue that holds the lens of the eye, and a network of blood vessels surrounding the eyeball called the choroid plexus.

Acknowledgments

The NIAMS gratefully acknowledges the assistance of the following individuals in the preparation and review of the original version of this publication: Kenneth T. Calamia, M.D., Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL; Joseph L. Jorizzo, M.D., Wake Forest University Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC; Barbara Mittleman, M.D., NIH; James Witter, M.D., Ph.D., NIAMS, NIH; and Roy S. Rogers, III, M.D., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

The mission of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH), is to support research into the causes, treatment, and prevention of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases; the training of basic and clinical scientists to carry out this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. The NIAMS Information Clearinghouse is a public service sponsored by the NIAMS that provides health information and information sources. Additional information can be found on the NIAMS website at www.niams.nih.g

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Raynaud’s Phenomenon.

Who Gets Raynaud’s Phenomenon?

Although people of any age can have Raynaud’s phenomenon, the primary form typically begins before the age of 30. Women are more likely than men to have Raynaud’s phenomenon. It appears to be more common in people who live in colder climates. This is likely true because people with the disorder have more Raynaud’s attacks during periods of colder weather.

Studies suggest that 3 to 12.5 percent of men and 6 to 20 percent of women report symptoms of Raynaud’s phenomenon. For most, the symptoms are mild and not associated with any blood vessel or tissue damage.

Most people with Raynaud’s phenomenon have the primary form, which is not associated with any underlying disease. In fact, in these individuals it is thought to be an exaggeration of normal responses to cold temperature and/or stress.

When Raynaud’s phenomenon is caused by or associated with an underlying disease, it is referred to as secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon. Secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon tends to begin later in life than the primary form.

It is common for patients with a connective tissue disease to have Raynaud’s phenomenon. It occurs in more than 90 percent of people with scleroderma. It is also common in people with systemic lupus erythematosus and with Sjögren’s syndrome. Secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon may also be associated with exposure to vibrating tools such as jackhammers, which cause trauma to the hands and wrists. And it may be linked to certain drugs, such as chemotherapy agents, or to chemicals such as vinyl chloride.

What Happens During an Attack?

Attacks of Raynaud’s phenomenon are caused by an intensification of the body’s natural response to cold. When a person is exposed to cold, the body’s normal response is to slow the loss of heat and preserve its core temperature. Blood vessels in the surface of the skin are called thermoregulatory vessels because they react to changes in the ambient temperature. To maintain normal core temperature, these specialized blood vessels in the skin surface constrict and move blood from arteries near the surface to veins deeper in the body. But for people who have Raynaud’s phenomenon, the thermoregulatory vessels overreact to cold exposure with sudden and intense spasmodic contractions of these small blood vessels that supply blood to the skin of the fingers, toes, ears, face, and other body areas.

Once an attack begins, a person may experience three phases (though not all people have all three) of skin color changes—typically from white to blue to red—in the fingers or toes. Whiteness (called pallor) may occur in response to spasms of the arterioles (small branches of an artery) and the resulting collapse of the arteries supplying the fingers and toes. Blueness (cyanosis) may appear because the fingers or toes are not getting enough oxygen-rich blood. Finally, as the arterioles dilate (relax) and blood returns to the digits, redness (rubor) may occur.

During the attack, the fingers or toes may feel cold and numb as blood flow to them is interrupted. As the attack ends and blood flow returns, fingers or toes may throb and tingle. Typically, the blood flow to the skin will remain low until the skin is rewarmed. After warming, it usually takes 15 minutes to recover normal blood flow to the skin.

What Is the Difference Between Primary and Secondary Raynaud’s Phenomenon?

In medical literature, primary Raynaud’s phenomenon may also be called idiopathic Raynaud’s phenomenon, primary Raynaud’s syndrome, or Raynaud’s disease. There is no known cause for primary Raynaud’s phenomenon. It is more common than the secondary form and often is so mild the patient never seeks medical attention. It generally is an annoyance that causes little disability. Secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon is a more complex and serious disorder.

The most common cause of secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon is connective tissue disease. The condition most commonly occurs with scleroderma or lupus, but is also associated with Sjögren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, and polymyositis. Some of these diseases reduce blood flow to the fingers and toes by causing blood vessel walls to thicken and the vessels to constrict too easily.

Other possible causes of secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon are carpal tunnel syndrome and obstructive arterial disease (blood vessel disease). Some drugs are also linked to Raynaud’s phenomenon. They include beta-blockers, used to treat high blood pressure; ergotamine preparations, used for migraine headaches; certain agents used in cancer chemotherapy; and drugs, such as over–the–counter cold medication and narcotics, that cause vasoconstriction.

People in certain occupations may be more vulnerable to secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon. Some workers in the plastics industry who are exposed to vinyl chloride, for example, develop a scleroderma-like illness, of which Raynaud’s phenomenon can be a part. Workers who operate vibrating tools can develop a type of Raynaud’s phenomenon called vibration-induced white finger.

Severe cases of Raynaud’s phenomenon—usually of the secondary form—can lead to problems such as skin ulcers (sores) or gangrene (tissue death) in the fingers and toes, which can be painful and difficult to treat.

How Does a Doctor Diagnose Raynaud’s Phenomenon?

Most doctors find it fairly easy to diagnose Raynaud’s phenomenon but find it more difficult to identify the form of the disorder.

Physicians can now distinguish primary from secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon with a complete history and physical examination. Sometimes, special blood testing is needed. If the evaluation and special testing studies are normal, then the diagnosis of primary Raynaud’s phenomenon can be made and it is unlikely to change into a secondary form. Interestingly, about 30 percent of first-degree relatives of patients with primary Raynaud’s phenomenon also have the condition. This finding suggests that primary Raynaud’s phenomenon is determined by some yet-to-be discovered genetic trait.

A few tests can help the doctor distinguish between primary and secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon. They are:

  • Nailfold capillaroscopy. During this test, the doctor puts a drop of oil on the patient’s nailfolds, the skin at the base of the fingernail. The doctor then examines the nailfolds under a microscope to look for problems in the tiny blood vessels called capillaries. If the capillaries are enlarged or malformed, the patient may have a connective tissue disease.
  • Antinuclear antibody (ANA) test. In this blood test, the doctor determines whether the body is producing special proteins called antibodies that are directed against the nuclei of the body’s cells. These abnormal antibodies are often found in people who have connective tissue diseases or other autoimmune disorders.
  • Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or sed rate). This is a laboratory test for inflammation that measures how quickly red blood cells fall to the bottom of a test tube of unclotted blood. Rapidly descending cells (an elevated sed rate) indicate inflammation in the body.

What Is the Treatment for Raynaud’s Phenomenon?

The aims of treatment are to reduce the number and severity of attacks and to prevent tissue damage and loss of tissue in the fingers and toes. Most doctors are conservative in treating patients with primary Raynaud’s phenomenon because they do not get tissue damage. For these patients, doctors tend to recommend nondrug treatments before moving onto medications. For patients with secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon, medications are more often prescribed, because severe attacks with ulcers or tissue damage are more likely.

In the most severe cases, Raynaud’s causes ulcers and serious tissue damage that does not respond to medications. Doctors may use a surgical procedure called a digital sympathectomy with adventitial stripping (which involves removing the tissue and nerves around the blood vessels supplying the affected digits). Although this procedure may result in reducing symptoms and healing tissue, it only helps temporarily and therefore is reserved for difficult cases.

The most common treatments and self-help measures are described below.

Nondrug Treatments and Self-Help Measures

The following nondrug treatments and self-help measures can decrease the severity of Raynaud’s attacks and promote overall well-being.

  • Take action during an attack. You can decrease both its length and severity by a few simple actions. The first and most important one is avoid the cold. Warming the body and the hands or feet is also helpful. If you’re outside and the weather is cold, go indoors. Run warm water over your fingers or toes or soak them in a bowl of warm water to warm them. If a stressful situation triggers the attack, get out of the stressful situation, if possible, and relax. Although biofeedback and similar nondrug methods are used, formal studies have suggested they are not helpful.
  • Keep warm. It is important not only to keep the extremities warm, but also to avoid chilling any part of the body. Remember, a drop in the body’s core temperature triggers the attack. Shifting temperature (for example, rapidly moving from 90 degrees outside to a 70-degree air-conditioned room) and damp rainy weather are to be avoided. In cold weather, pay particular attention to dressing. Several layers of loose clothing, socks, hats, and gloves or mittens are recommended. A hat is important because a great deal of body heat is lost through the scalp. Keep feet warm and dry. Some people find it helpful to wear mittens and socks to bed during the winter. Chemical warmers, such as small heating pouches that can be placed in pockets, mittens, boots, or shoes, can give added protection during long periods outdoors.People who have secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon should talk to their doctors before exercising outdoors in cold weather.

    In warm weather, be aware that air conditioning also can trigger attacks. Setting the thermostat at a higher temperature or wearing a sweater indoors can help prevent an attack. Some people find it helpful to use insulated drinking glasses and to put on gloves before handling frozen or refrigerated foods.

  • Do not smoke. The nicotine in cigarettes causes the skin temperature to drop, which may lead to an attack.
  • Avoid aggravating medications such as vasconstrictors, which cause the blood vessels to narrow. Vasoconstrictors include beta-blockers, many cold preparations, caffeine, narcotics, some migraine headache medications, some chemotherapeutic drugs, and some blood pressure medications. Some studies also associate the use of estrogen with Raynaud’s phenomenon.
  • Control stress. Because stress and emotional upsets may trigger an attack, particularly for people who have primary Raynaud’s phenomenon, learning to recognize and avoid stressful situations may help control the number of attacks. Many people have found that relaxation can help decrease the number and severity of attacks. Local hospitals and other community organizations, such as schools, often offer programs in stress management.
  • Exercise regularly. Many doctors encourage patients who have Raynaud’s phenomenon—particularly the primary form—to exercise regularly. Most people find that exercise promotes overall well-being, increases energy level, helps control weight, and promotes cardiovascular fitness and restful sleep. Patients with Raynaud’s phenomenon should talk to their doctors before starting an exercise program.
  • See a doctor. People with Raynaud’s phenomenon should see their doctors if they are worried or frightened about attacks or if they have questions about caring for themselves. They should always see their doctors if episodes occur only on one side of the body (one hand or one foot) and any time one results in sores or ulcers on the fingers or toes.

Treatment With Medications

People with secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon are more likely than those with the primary form to be treated with medications. Many doctors believe that the most effective and safest drugs for Raynaud’s phenomenon are calcium channel blockers. These drugs, which are used to treat high blood pressure, work by relaxing the smooth muscle and dilating the small blood vessels. This decreases the frequency and severity of Raynaud’s attacks. These drugs can also help heal skin ulcers on the fingers or toes.

Some patients have found relief with alpha receptor blockers, which are high blood pressure medications. These medications counteract the actions of norepinephrine, a hormone that constricts blood vessels. Effects are reported to be modest and side effects are associated with long-term use.

To help heal skin ulcers, some doctors prescribe a nonspecific vasodilator (drug that relaxes blood vessels) such as nitroglycerine paste, which is applied to the fingers. Many new agents that vasodilate are being used in cases that do not respond to the treatments above. Patients should keep in mind that the treatment for Raynaud’s phenomenon is not always successful. Often, patients with the secondary form will not respond as well to treatment as those with the primary form of the disorder. In cases of critical digital ischemia (where the blood flow will not return and finger loss may result), intravenous vasodilator therapy is used with prostaglandins.

Patients may find that one drug works better than another. Some people may experience side effects that require stopping the medication. For other people, a drug may become less effective over time. Women of childbearing age should know that the medications used to treat Raynaud’s phenomenon may affect the growing fetus. Therefore, women who are pregnant or who might become pregnant should avoid taking these medications if possible. Interestingly, Raynaud’s phenomenon gets better or goes away during pregnancy.

Self-Help Reminders

  • Take action during an attack.
  • Keep warm.
  • Don’t smoke.
  • Avoid aggravating medications.
  • Control stress.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • See a doctor if questions or concerns develop.

What Research Is Being Conducted on Raynaud’s Phenomenon?

Researchers are studying techniques to better diagnose Raynaud’s phenomenon and to predict and monitor its course and responsiveness to treatment. Scientists continue to evaluate the use of new treatments to improve blood flow for those who have Raynaud’s phenomenon.

Basic investigators are studying the molecular mechanisms behind Raynaud’s phenomenon, the anatomy of blood vessels, and possible genetic associations. Researchers in scleroderma and other connective tissue diseases are also investigating Raynaud’s phenomenon in relation to these diseases.

More information on research is available from the following websites:

  • NIH Clinical Research Trials and You helps people learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and how to participate. Visitors to the website will find information about the basics of participating in a clinical trial, first-hand stories from actual clinical trial volunteers, explanations from researchers, and links to how to search for a trial or enroll in a research-matching program.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov offers up-to-date information for locating federally and privately supported clinical trials for a wide range of diseases and conditions.
  • NIH RePORTER is an electronic tool that allows users to search a repository of both intramural and extramural NIH-funded research projects from the past 25 years and access publications (since 1985) and patents resulting from NIH funding.
  • PubMed is a free service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine that lets you search millions of journal citations and abstracts in the fields of medicine, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine, the health care system, and preclinical sciences.

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What is Functional Neruology?

Functional Neurology

What is Chiropractic Neurology Jersey shore sunsetand Functional Neurology?

Chiropractic Neurology is defined as the field of functional neurology that engages the internal and external environment of the individual in a structured and targeted approach to affect positive changes in the neuraxis and consequent physiology and behavior.  Simply put, we use sensory integration to affect the motoric systems.  This has in essence coined the term “functional integrative rehabilitative neurology”, and thus the correlation to functional neurology.

Chiropractic Neurology: Our Philosophy

Oftentimes, I am asked, “what is a chiropractic neurologist?  Well, simply answered, just as other physicians do, we have sub-specialties within the chiropractic profession. Through residency training and board certification,  practice is typically limited to the specialty of neurology.  Even further, many of us sub-specialize into specific areas of neurology, as in my particular practice, which focuses on movement disorders, and involves vertigo symptoms, imbalance, dizziness and , dystonia, ADD ADHD, headaches, and pain. Typically, a chiropractic neurologist serves in the same consulting manner as a medical neurologist. The difference is that the therapies or applications of a chiropractic neurologist do not include drugs or surgery. In accordance with this, certain conditions are more customarily amenable to treatment by a chiropractic neurologist as opposed to a medical neurologist, and vice versa. There are naturally conditions for which drugs and surgery are more appropriate, and, many conditions for which drugs and surgery are inappropriate. There is a growing demand for the drug free functional integrative neurologic rehabilitative treatments that we provide. Although not against the utilization of surgery or drugs when appropriate, our treatment focuses on not using them. We will refer a patient to another appropriate specialist who uses these modalities if that treatment is the most appropriate for a given condition.

Our treatments are always diagnosis guided, and never at random, and, they are always measured for outcome assessments.  This means that prior to any treatment, a complete history and neurologic physical examination are performed.  Pre and post treatment assessment is measured to assure that improvement is evident.  Because of this approach, many of our patients experience improvement which is dramatic and quick, without the need for lengthy drawn out “return” treatment programs.

Dr. Scopelliti is a Functional Neurologist in Monmouth County NJ.

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Supporting people with invisible illnesses