Tag Archives: Anxiety

Nuerological conditions significantly increase someone to consider suicide.

People diagnosed with MS are twice as likely to commit suicide then the general population, with in 2 years post stroke the risk is also twice as high, ALS, Dementia and other neurological diseases. Some have a plan, some don’t, there is plenty of help out in the medical community, but getting the patient to admit they are depressed is the first hurdle, Then the Doctors want to medicate and medicate you until you are no longer you. Some of the Antidepressants actually cause you to want to commit suicide, I know from experience myself, a medication given to me called Savella made me want to commit suicide, but at least I could recognize something was wrong and I called my Doctor right away, only with the response of well we have a entire list to try so don’t get discouraged.

There are a few red flags, someone talking about suicide or actually attempting suicide but their is no real profile and sometimes asking questions to the patient doesn’t help because they think there fine or won’t admit their feeling suicidal. Family and friends should be specially concerned if there loved one has a neurological disorder. If a patient is depressed and suffering from anxiety they are even at a higher risk. If you add substance abuse or drug use and it increases even more.

When a patient starts a new prescription, this is usually the time to watch them closely, It may motivate them to do things they normally wouldn’t do. Doctors should not only treat the depression but understand the neurological disease the patient has. The two go together and the key is knowledge. This type of patient should be monitored by the Doctor more closely.

Isolation is a very big contributor to depression and suicidal tendency’s. Impulse control- neurological diseases can cause patients to loose their impulse control. This can also add to the risk factor of suicide. Frontal lobe dysfunction adds to the lack of impulse control. The Frontal lobe is considered to be the CEO of the brain.

Certain Hospitals and come up with Risk score assessment forms for different neurological conditions.

Getting the patient to see a trained psychiatrist that actually understands your disease, If your friend or loved one speaks of suicide bring them to the Emergency Room or call 911.

As family and friends it’s important to try to lead this patient to job, their dog, grandchildren-something to distract from the darkness they are living in. Stay close, try to get the patient out into socializing and out of the house. You need to recognize their frustrations, Don’t just say ” Don’t do that, You have so much to live for”. You must acknowledge their feelings and thoughts, make them your safe place to come to talk to about their feelings, that’s how you will know what’s really going on. Building trust with out judgement. Take the conversation of suicide seriously, encourage engagement, patients like myself feel like our lives have been taken away from us, we no longer serve a purpose but now are a burden, Help them get involved in organizations, support groups, non profits so they can feel good about them selves. Keep guns out of the house period. If a firearm is used the death rate is 85%, Pills, and cutting themselves are less likely to work.

Talk to the patient if guns are to be removed explaining it’s because they love you. Not as a punishment and if you feel the patient is in imminent danger, call 911.

Suicide has a stigma, that needs to be addressed, knowledge spread and shared. Below you find information on Suicide.

1-800-suicide or1-800-784-2433

suicidology.org 202-237-2280 This is the American Association that can help families that are dealing with a family member that committed suicide or someone who has survived suicide. there support programs are the following: suicidology.org/suicide-survivors/sos-directory.

American foundation for suicide prevention: afsp.org 1800-273-talk. 24 hour hotline with trained personal as well as books, forums, you can also get names of support groups in your area.

Suicide Awareness voices of education (SAVE) save.org,9529467998, they have booklets and other resources for survivors of suicide loss and a searchable data base for support groups.

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What it feels like to have a heart attack

I have been not blogging as much lately due to health issues.  I wanted to explain to you what it feels like to have a heart attack,  There are so many symptoms that are different for each person.

chest tightness

indigestion

nausea

flu

fatigue

pain down the arms

chest pain

lightheaded

Dizzy

back pain

anxiety

neck pain.

For me it I had received the ok  that there was nothing wrong with my heart, I traveled out of town for some new testing being one on the Autonomic System (follow up article on that soon)  and felt ok

I went to dinner and while eating I was starting to feel like I had a corset being pulled tighter so I thought I had something in my throat, so I started drinking water and no relief.  I thought to myself, I have never felt this way, that tightness was getting tighter and tighter, but no pain, no shortness of breath at the time. no pain down the arm.  We decided to pay the bill and get to the ER.  I was literally unconscious , they cut my clothes off and I really didn’t feel that much pain just the tightness, a feeling of a rubber band feeling around my chest.    I did hear “We are loosing her”  But I was at peace with that except I kept thinkin about my boys, then I would pass out again.  I  gave it to god and just let go and figured what ever is going to happen I have no control.  There was a positive Troponin test and then a negative but with one positive that said I had a heart attack.  I don’t remember anything, I heard then saying they were going to use the paddles but just kept injecting meds and I didn’t feel any of it, I remember seeing my heart rate at 180 then it came down to 160 and another injection , I don’t remember anything after that except I had to have a heart surgery ,  I woke up from surgery a freezing of the heart which is a new ablation and they can while its defrosting burn  the abnormal firing of your electrical system. not knowing what had happened.  I was by myself so I still was scared being by myself, could it happen again, I was afraid    Alone.  I had no family there.  There is nothing worse than being in the hospital Critical care unit by myself for 11 days, I did have a visit from  family from  the other side just not mine,  That hurt more than the heart attack.

But I moved passed that and am focusing on my health.    I needed to let go of the negativity I needed to focus on me, my heart so I can be here for my kids.  the others that choose to not visit well that’s there issue and something they have to live with, because I could have not made it!  that’s something they will have to deal with.

After the procedure, No one realized I was internally bleeding, So that was another even more painful experience that won’t be going away anytime soon, the Hematoma actually moved my uterus, sitting on my bladder which you can imagine hurt and continues to hurt.  So even though everything didn’t go smoothly, I am alive.

My reasoning for this article is not for sympathy but so people recognize signs for a heart attack and even though you have given a clean bill of health by a cardiologist and electro physiologist that means nothing, you need to listen to your heart and your gutt and if you feel things are not right get a second opinion.  And Remember  Everyone feels a heart attack differently, It’s not  so much what we see on TV and you may feel it differently, Time is your best friend so if you are feeling something new like I did, it happened so fast,  If I didn’t listen to my gut maybe a different decision would have been set up differently and I wouldn’t be here today.  It’s better to be safe then sorry.

 

Have a great day!

kelly

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Energy efficient light bulbs are so toxic!

do not use these light bulbs they make you sick
Home Health These Light Bulbs Cause Anxiety, Migraines, And Even Cancer. If You Have…
These Light Bulbs Cause Anxiety, Migraines, And Even Cancer. If You Have Them, Do THIS Immediately !
January 14, 2016
Many of us in the effort to save energy and money, replaced our old standard light bulbs with environmentally-friendly with the new generation energy saving light bulbs. However, the new generation of energy efficient light bulbs are so toxic that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency created an emergency protocol you need to follow in the event of a bulb breakage, due to the poison gas that is released. If broken indoors, these light bulbs release 20 times the maximum acceptable mercury concentration into the air, according to a study conducted by researchers from the Fraunhofer Wilhelm Klauditz Institute for German’s Federal Environment Agency.
do not use these light bulbs they make you sick
Energy Efficient Light Bulbs Can Cause:

Dizziness

Cluster headaches

Migraines

Seizures

Fatigue

Inability to concentrate

Anxiety
Energy Efficient Bulbs Cause Anxiety, Migraines, and Even Cancer. Reasons to Go Back To Incandescent Bulbs
1. Energy saving bulbs contain mercury. Murcury ia a potent neurotoxin that is especially dangerous to children and pregnant women. It is especially toxic to the brain, the nervous system, the liver and the kidneys. It can also damage the cardiovascular, immune and reproductive systems. It can lead lead to tremors, anxiety, insomnia, memory loss, headaches, cancer and Alzheimer’s .
2. Energy saving bulbs can cause cancer.
A new study performed by by Peter Braun at Berlin Germany’s Alab Laboratory found these light bulbs contain poisonous carcinogens that could cause cancer:
Phenol, a mildly acidic toxic white crystalline solid, obtained from coal tar and used in chemical manufacture (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenol).
Naphthalene, a volatile white crystalline compound, produced by the distillation of coal tar, used in mothballs and as a raw material for chemical manufacture (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naphthalene).
Styrene, an unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon, obtained as a petroleum byproduct(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Styrene).
3. Energy saving light bulbs emit a lot of UV rays.
Energy saving lamps emit UV-B and traces of UV-C radiation. It is generally recognised that UV-radiation is harmful for the skin (can lead to skin cancer) and the eyes. The radiation from these bulbs directly attacks the immune system, and furthermore damages the skin tissues enough to prevent the proper formation of vitamin D-3.
GE Lighting 48415 60-Watt 825-Lumen General Purpose A19 Incandescent Light Bulb, Soft White, 48-Pack
In conclusion, these bulbs are so toxic that we are not supposed to put them in the regular garbage. They are household hazardous waste. If you break one in a house, you are supposed to open all of your windows and doors, and evacuate the house for at least 15 minutes to minimize your exposure to the poisonous gas. Unfortunately, soon consumers won’t have the option to buy incandescent lights because they won’t be available. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) mandates the phase-out of incandescent light bulbs, and favors energy-efficient compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs.

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Just what is Fibromyalgia and the new treatments!!!!

Just what is Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia is a disorder that is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain. Many people can get confused about the actual meaning of a fibromyalgia diagnosis, thinking it is simply a ‘catchall’ type of diagnosis. This is not actually true. For example, rheumatoid arthritis is distinguished from other types of arthritis because of its specific symptoms. Fibromyalgia, however, is a syndrome, which means it has a specific set of symptoms that the person experiences as well as specific signs that a health care practitioner can identify. Learn from top health experts about the key factors behind fibromyalgia, the disorders

www.painfromfibromyalgia.com

1 Trick To Fibromyalgia

See How to Relieve Fibromyalgia With This Fast and Easy Trick

www.fibrowellnesspeople.com

potentially linked to it and more with these resources today:

Fibromyalgia is a specific, non-degenerative, chronic, non-inflammatory, non-progressive, true systemic pain condition. Disorders potentially linked to fibromyalgia include depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. Women are more likely to develop fibromyalgia and symptoms than are men. The symptoms of fibromyalgia frequently begin following a physical trauma, infection, surgery or a significant psychological stress. In some situations, the symptoms gradually accumulate over time and do not have a single triggering event. Many people who are diagnosed with fibromyalgia also have temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ), tension headaches, anxiety, depression and/or irritable bowel syndrome. The symptoms of fibromyalgia include: widespread pain, which is typically described as a continuous, dull ache that has lasted for three months. In order for the pain to be considered widespread, it must occur on both sides of the body as well as above and below the waist. Fatigue is a common symptom for those diagnosed with fibromyalgia. People with fibromyalgia often wake up tired, even after sleeping for long periods of time and their sleep is frequently disrupted by pain. Other sleep disorders have been noted as well, such as sleep apnea and/or restless legs syndrome. Another significant symptom is cognitive difficulties, which is often referred to as “fibro fog” as it impairs the ability to pay attention, focus and concentrate on mental tasks. Also depression, headaches, cramping and pain in their lower abdomen have been known to occur.

It has not been determined what the exact cause of fibromyalgia is, but many health professionals believe it involves a variety of different factors working together. Some of the factors include; genetics, because fibromyalgia often runs in families, an infection may trigger or aggravate fibromyalgia and/or a physical or emotional trauma, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, which is been linked to fibromyalgia. There are number of theories relating to why fibromyalgia causes pain. For example, some researchers have reported that repeated nerve stimulations cause the brain of someone with fibromyalgia to change. The change involves an abnormal increase in the level of the neurotransmitters that signal pain to the brain. Also, the pain receptors in the brain appear to develop a type of memory of the pain, which it becomes more sensitive to, meaning it can lead to an overreaction of pain signals.

Key Factors Behind Fibromyalgia
The risk factors for fibromyalgia typically include; being a woman, having a relative also diagnosed with fibromyalgia and if you have a rheumatic disease, such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. It is often difficult to diagnose fibromyalgia and many people often go years before a diagnosis is made. Doctors previously checked 18 specific points on your body to see how many points were painful when firm pressure was applied. The current guidelines for diagnosing fibromyalgia no longer require this type of exam, instead the diagnosis can be made if you have had widespread pain for greater than three months and without an underlying medical condition that may be the cause of your pain. There are no specific lab tests that can be done to confirm the diagnosis of fibromyalgia, however, your doctor may run a variety of tests to rule out any other conditions that may have similar symptoms. For example, a blood test is typically done to check your complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and thyroid function.

Treatments
In general, treatments for fibromyalgia include both medication and self-care. The emphasis is on minimizing symptoms and improving general health. No one treatment works for all symptoms.

There are a variety of medications that may be prescribed to help relieve the pain associated with fibromyalgia and to help improve sleep patterns. Some of the common types of medications include: over-the-counter pain relievers or your physician may prescribe pain relievers, such as tramadol. A narcotic is not usually prescribed for alleviating the pain of fibromyalgia because they can often lead to a dependence on the medication and may worsen the pain over time. Antidepressants are sometimes prescribed to help lower the fatigue and pain that is associated with fibromyalgia and anti-seizure medications may occasionally be prescribed to help reduce certain types of pain.

Many people who suffer with fibromyalgia find relieve for the pain as well as management for their stress, through alternative therapies. Some of the most common alternative therapies used to treat the symptoms of fibromyalgia include; massage therapy, meditation and or yoga. One of the most important things you can do to help relieve the symptoms of fibromyalgia is self-care. Self-care is essential to help avoid stress, overexertion and fatigue. It is critical that you get enough sleep, because fatigue is one of the primary symptoms of fibromyalgia. Regular exercise will help to decrease the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Daily exercise, such as stretching, walking, bicycling and swimming are excellent ways to help reduce your pain as well as help you sleep better at night. Although it is important to avoid overexertion, it is important to remain at least moderately active. You should also maintain a healthy lifestyle, which includes eating healthy, limiting your daily intake of caffeine and avoiding tobacco and alcohol.

For those suffering with fibromyalgia, the lack of sleep and the pain often interferes with the ability to function while at home or at work. Along with the fatigue and pain associated with fibromyalgia, you may also have to deal with the frustration that accompanies the disorder, because it is such a misunderstood diagnosis. This frustration many people feel may lead to anxiety and/or depression. So, it is essential to educate yourself on the disorder, which makes it helpful to provide your friends and family with more information about your diagnosis. There is currently no cure for fibromyalgia, but certain medications are often beneficial in helping to control the symptoms. It is also beneficial to recognize the fact that you are not alone. There are a number of organizations, such as the American Chronic Pain Association and the National Fibromyalgia Association that can help connect you with others who are experiencing the same problems and that will understand what you are going through.

I have fibro and its not easy to live with, specially since Doctor’s treat you like you are crazy, Somedays I feel like I have been hit by a semi truck, a dull ache everywhere, just keeps moving around, its hurt’s to be touched, poked or tickled. It’s not easy living with this disease, and I don’t want to take pain medications because they can do more harm than good, so for me, I have to be careful how much I do, know my limits, I found a 3 foot heating pad that is my best friend, hot baths every day with Epson salt. Try to not get my legs cold, not stand on hard surfaces for any length of time. changed all my shoes out. No more heals! Even certain fabric can hurt my skin, I have to be careful with that. So basically this disease really sucks, But I have tried to find ways to make it livable since it’s not curable. Kelly

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Concussion with Vestibular complications by the Vestibular.org

 Concussion article by the Vestibular.org

Concussion
When Recovery Is Complicated By Vestibuar Involvement
And How Vestibular Rehabilitation Can Help
By Nicole Miranda, PT, DPT
What happens to the brain and
vestibular system after concussion?
Concussion can occur under the following
conditions:
The head strikes a stationary
object. Common
examples include
a fall where the head hits the
ground or an object, or hitting the
head on an object during an auto
accident.
An object hits the head,
such as a ball or stick
during sports, or as a result
of human collision.
A quick
acceleration/deceleration of
the head with no contact to
any surface. This can occur
in dancers and gymnasts
due to rapid movement, or
during an auto accident
where there appears to be
no head trauma.
These events all cause quick
deceleration of the head and
shifting of delicate brain tissue
inside the skull. Rarely does an
accident of this nature occur in a
true head
on or forward/backward
direction. There is typically a
rotational force, as would occur if
one were struck on the right
struck on the right or
left side of the forehead. If the body
 is traveling forward or facing
forward in a still position, and a
force occurs off center, the brain sustains
a rotational sheer force, which causes
more trauma
brain structures and
therefore a more severe concussion.
Loss of consciousness and nausea at the
time of injury are signs that rotational
forces have occurred.
Current research on athletes shows that
nerve signals in the brain are disrupted
for 30 days after a single concussion, and
during this time frame people are more
likely to have her injury if engaged in
sport activities. This is because reaction
time and brain processing are not normal.
We are less likely to see something, like a
ball, coming toward the head during this
vulnerable period. If more than one
concussion occurs, the
symptoms are
typically worse and recovery time is
increased.
Trauma to the brain can result in
abnormal vestibular system functioning,
and the brain can receive abnormal
signals regarding the position and
movement of the head in space. When
vestibular information is inaccurate, the
brain most often relies on visual input to
stabilize the head on the body. This
means that the visual system becomes
the most reliable system to quickly
assess one’s position in space and to
remain balanced.
Relying upon vision
alone as the primary source of balance
often leads to fatigue and difficulty
performing routine daily activities.
Reliance on the visual system for balance
can result in eyestrain and tension
headaches. If the vestibular system is
delivering inaccurate information to the
brain about the head’s position in space,
the brain must rely on visual input and
joint sensors (proprioception) to feel the
body in space. Failure to effectively
compensate with the use of visual
references and being aware of the surface
on which one is sitting or standing results
in dizziness and a sense of instability.
Dizziness encourages a person to refrain
from moving the head, and leads to neck
stiffness and headaches. Presence of a
whiplash associated with the concussion
further complicates the diagnosis and
suddenly symptoms limit the ability to
participate in life activities.
HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAD A
CONCUSSION?
There is currently no diagnostic test for
the presence of a concussion. If there is
any suspicion of a concussion during
sporting activity, an athlete or child
should be removed from play to watch
and assess behavior, and in many states
medical clearance is necessary to legally
return to play. If a person develops signs
of neurological injury, such as repeated
vomiting, seizure activity, loss of
consciousness, unequal pupil size,
confusion or slurred speech, immediate
medical attention is necessary to rule out
serious brain trauma.  Apart from sports,
any mechanism of trauma to the head
and neck can result in concussion and
should be evaluated if symptoms are
present.
Concussion injury does not appear on any
routine brain scan such as CT or MRI, and
there is no diagnostic test for concussions
 A diagnosis of concussion is
made based on a group of symptoms that
can become immediately present or may
arise over weeks to months after injury.
Acute symptoms can be present for one to
symptoms can be present for one to two
weeks following the concussion,
and the most common recommendation
is to limit activities and rest the brain
with the anticipation of natural recovery.
Presence of three or more of the following
symptoms within four weeks of injury is
classified as Post Concussion Syndrome
Thinking/
Remembering
Physical
Emotional/
Mood
Sleep
Difficulty thinking clearly
Headache
Fuzzy or blurry
vision
Irritability
Sleeping more than
usual
Feeling slowed down
Nausea or vomiting
(early on)
Dizziness
Sadness
Sleeping
less than
usual
Difficulty concentrating
Sensitivity to noise
or light
Balance problems
More emotional
Trouble falling asleep
Difficulty remembering
new information
Feeling tired,
having no energy
Nervousness or
anxiety
www.cdc.gov/concussion/signs_symptoms.html
WHY DO SOME PEOPLE HAVE
Few to no symptoms, some people slowly
DEVELOP SYMPTOMS OVER
TIME AND OTHERS FEEL THEY
CANNOT FUNCTION AFTER
CONCUSSION?
It can be normal to have no symptoms
after a concussive event. In studies of
athletes, Almost all subjects are free of
symptoms by three days after the injury
while brain studies still show reduced
nerve signal transmission and risk of
injury for up to 30 days.
Other people feel normal for two to three
weeks, then have a steady headache,
dizziness or fatigue that at times are not
recognized as being caused by the
concussion. Fewer people have
immediate and more severe concussive
symptoms that last for prolonged time
frames.
We now know some response to
concussion can be influenced by genetics.
People who have a history of dementia or
Alzheimer’s disease in their family can be
more at risk for having a worse response
after concussion. This is because some
people have proteins (Tau) in the brain
that already place them at risk of
memory problems, which can be
aggravated by concussion. This results in
more cognitive difficulties
with memory, concentration and motivation
afterexperiencing a concussion..
Due to the forces involved in concussion,
it is very common to sustain a whiplash
injury that is often not diagnosed with the
concussion. As the head decelerates or
receives the force of an incoming
object,
the neck muscles are strained. The
effects of whiplash injury are not always
immediate and can appear
two to three weeks later with an
increasing number of tension headaches
and visual disturbances. Dizziness can also occur
related to neck strain. This delayed
increase in symptoms can interfere
greatly with school and work
performance.
Finally, many people have previous
conditions that make the brain’s response
to concussion more problematic. A prior
history of migraine headaches can lead to
complex migraines after
experiencing a concussion.
concussion. At times migraines can occur
without headache and produce only aura
 that feels like vertigo or dizziness lasting
for multiple hours or days. Failure
to recognize and treat migraine activity
can lead to prolonged symptoms and
places more stress on the brain, limiting
recovery.  A History of visual disturbances or
childhood sensory processing issues also
affects one’s response to concussion. For
example, if a person had difficulty with
distance vision or depth perception before
the injury, the brain adjusted to that problem.
. After an injury, the way in
which the brain compensated for the
visual problem may not work as well, and
the ability to focus on static objects or
following moving objects may cause
symptoms of dizziness,
as well as head pressure, head fog
and concentration problems.
 Likewise, if a prior history of
sensory integration problems and history
of motion sickness is present, concussion
can again cause increased difficulty for
the brain to process vestibular
information.
HOW DO SYMPTOMS OF
CONCUSSION AFFECT DAILY LIFE?
The concussion injury itself is ‘invisible’,
as headache, dizziness, head fog, eye
strain and fatigue are rarely perceived by
others. Thus, the disruption of the
brain’s ability to process sensory input
can result in extreme fatigue, frusteration
and emotional instability. In children,
this manifests as behavioral outbursts or
tantrums. Highly visual activities
overwhelm the brain, so crowded
environments (work, school, stores,
public events) can cause elevation of
symptoms or anxiety.
Work and school performance can suffer
as concentration and memory are
affected. Adjusting visual focus from
near and far can cause dizziness and
headache. In schools, looking from the
desk to PowerPoint presentations or too
boards in front of the classroom is
extremely challenging. Children and
adults alike report difficulty remembering
information and concentrating with
reduced accuracy in work performance.
Students have trouble completing
homework and adults arrive home from
work with extreme fatigue and lack of
energy to engage in family and household
activities.
Complex visual environments elevate
symptoms of headache, head pressure,
dizziness and imbalance, and can cause
anxiety. Over time people tend to
withdraw from outings and can become
depressed from the inability to perform
routine daily activities. Crowded places
are difficult to navigate because of the
movement of people and complex visual
background in the observers peripheral
vision. Thes visual distractions cause a
sese of imbalance and dizziness, often
with head pressure, that can lead to panic
attacks or avoidance of activity.
HOW CAN I BEST COPE WITH
Symptoms of concussion. ?
The best treatment for symptoms of a concussion is
assessment of vestibular function by a Physical Therapist..
A comprehensive vestibular
evaluation should include examination of
balance activities that involve the
vestibular, vision and proprioceptive
systems, which reveals how the brain
interprets movement of the body and
head relative to space and the visual
surround.  A cervical examination determine
if neck sprain or dizziness

Concussion
When Recovery Is Complicated By Vestibu
lar Involvement
And How Vestibular Rehabilitation Can Help
By Nicole Miranda, PT, DPT
What happens to the brain and
vestibular system after concussion?
Concussion can occur under the following
conditions:
The head strikes a stationary
object. Common
examples include
a fall where the head hits the
ground or an object, or hitting the
head on an object during an auto
accident.
An object hits the head,
such as a ball or stick
during sports, or as a result
of human collision.
A quick
acceleration/deceleration of the head with no  contact to
any surface. This can occur
in dancers and gymnasts
due to rapid movement, or
during an auto accident
where there appears to be
no head trauma.
These events all cause quick
deceleration of the head and
shifting of deli
cate brain tissue
inside the skull. Rarely does an
accident of this nature occur in a
true head on or forward/backward
direction. There is typically a
rotational force, as would occur if
one were struck on the right or
left side of the forehead. If the
body is traveling forward or facing
forward in a still position, and a
force occurs off center, the brain sustains
a rotational sheer force, which causes
more trauma
brain structures and
therefore a more severe concussion.
Loss of consciousness and nausea at the
time of injury are signs that rotational
forces have occurred.
Current research on athletes shows that
nerve signals in the brain are disrupted
for 30 days after a single concussion, and
during this time frame people are more
likely to have anot
her injury if engaged in
sport activities. This is because reaction
time and brain processing are not normal.
We are less likely to see something, like a
ball, coming toward the head during this
vulnerable period. If more than one
concussion occurs, the symptoms are
typically worse and recovery time is
increased.
Trauma to the brain can result in
abnormal vestibular system functioning,
and the brain can receive abnormal
signals regarding the position and
movement of the head in space. When
vestibular information is inaccurate, the
brain most often relies on visual input to
stabilize the head on the body. This
means that the visual system becomes
the most reliable system to quickly
assess one’s position in space and to
remain balanced.
Relying upon vision
alone as the primary source of balance
often leads to fatigue and difficulty
performing routine daily activities.
Reliance on the visual system for balance
can result in eyestrain and tension
headaches. If the vestibular system is
delivering inaccurate  information to  The brain about the head’s position in space,
the brain must rely on visual input and
joint sensors (proprioception) to feel the
body in space. Failure to effectively
compensate with the use of visual
use of visual
references and being aware of the surface
on which one is sitting or standing results
in dizziness and a sense of instability.
Dizziness encourages a person to refrain
from moving the head, and leads to neck
stiffness and headaches. Presence of a
whiplash associated with the concussion
further complicates the diagnosis and
complicates the diagnosis and
suddenly symptoms limit the ability to
participate in life activities.
HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAD A
CONCUSSION?
There is currently no diagnostic test for
the presence of a concussion. If there is
any suspicion of a concussion during
sporting activity, an athlete or child
should be removed from play to watch
and assess behavior, and in many states
medical clearance is necessary to legally
return to play. If a person develops signs
of neurological injury, such as repeated
vomiting,seizure activity, loss of
consciousness, unequal pupil size,
confusion or slurred speech, immediate
medical attention is necessary to rule out
serious brain trauma.
Apart from sports, any mechanism
of trauma to the head
and neck can result in concussion and
should be evaluated if symptoms are
present.
Concussion injury does not appear on any
routine brain scan such as CT or MRI, and
there is no diagnostic test for concussion
 A diagnosis of concussion is
made based on a group of symptoms that
can become immediately present or may arise
 over weeks to months after injury.
Acute symptoms can be present for one
to two weeks following the concussion,
and the most common recommendation
is to limit activities and rest the brain
with the anticipation of natural recovery
Presence of three or more of the following
symptoms within four weeks of injury is
classified as Post Concussion Syndrome.
Thinking/
Remembering
Physical
Emotional/
Mood
Sleep
Difficulty thinking clearly
Headache
Fuzzy or blurry
vision
Irri
tability
Sleeping more than
usual
Feeling slowed down
Nausea or vomiting
(early on)
Dizziness
Sadness
Sleeping
less than usual concentrating
Sensitivity to noise
or light
Balance problems
More emotional
Trouble falling asleep
Difficulty remembering
new information
Feeling tired,
having no energy
Nervousness or
anxiety, few to
no sumptoms, some people
slowly develop symptoms over
time and others feel they cannot
function after concussion?
It can be normal to have no symptoms
after a concussive event. In studies of
athletes, almost all subjects are free of
all symptoms by three days after injury
while brain studies
still show reduced
nerve signal transmission and risk of
injury for up to 30 days.
Other people feel normal for two to
three weeks, then have a steady increase in
headaches, dizziness or fatigue that at times at not
recognized as being caused by the
concussion.
Fewer people have
immediate and more severe concussive
symptoms that last for prolonged time
frames.
We now know some response to
concussion can be influenced by genetics.
People who have a history of dementia or
Alzheimer’s disease in their family can be
more at risk for having a worse response
after a concussion. This is because some
people have proteins (Tau) in the brain
that already place them at risk of
memory problems, which can be
aggravated by concussion. This results in
more cognitive difficulties
with memory,
concentration and motivation
after experiencing a concussion.
.
Due to the forces involved in concussion,
it is very common to sustain a whiplash
injury that is often not diagnosed with the
concussion. As the head decelerates or
receives the force of an incoming
object,
the neck muscles are strained. The
effects of whiplash injury are not always
immediate and can appear
two to three weeks later with an increasing number
of tension headaches and visual disturbances,
weeks later  Dizziness can also occur
related to neck strain. This delayed
increase in symptoms can interfere
greatly with school and work
performance.
Finally, many people have previous
conditions that make the brain’s response
to concussion more problematic. A prior
history of migraine headaches can lead to
complex migraines after
experiencing a concussion.
 At times migraines can occur
without headache and
produce only an
aura that feels like vertigo or dizziness
lasting, for multiple hours or days. Failure
to recognize and treat migraine activity
can lead to prolonged symptoms and
places more stress on the brain, limiting recovery.
A history of visual disturbances or
childhood sensory processing issues also
affects one’s response to concussion. For
example, if a person had difficulty with
distance vision or depth perception before
the injury, the brain adjusted to that problem.
brain adjusted. After an injury, the way in
which the brain compensated for the
visual problem may not work as well, and
the ability to focus on static objects or following
moving objects may cause symptoms of dizziness as well
as head pressure, head fog and concentration.
. Likewise, if a prior history of
sensory integration problems and history
of motion sickness is present, concussion
can again cause increased difficulty for
the brain to process vestibular
information.
HOW DO SYMPTOMS OF
CONCUSSION AFFECT DAILY LIFE?
The concussion injury itself is ‘invisible’,
as headache, dizziness, head fog, eye
strain and fatigue are rarely perceived by
others. Thus, the disruption of the
brain’s ability to process sensory input
can result in extre
me fatigue, frustration
and emotional instability. In children,
this manifests as behavioral outbursts or
tantrums. Highly visual activities
overwhelm the brain, so crowded
environments (work, school, stores,
public events) can cause elevation of
symptoms or anxiety.
Work and school performance can suffer
as concentration and memory are
affected. Adjusting visual focus from
near and far can cause dizziness and
headache. In schools, looking from the
desk to PowerPoint presentations or
order boards in front of the classroom
is extremely challenging. Children and
adults alike report difficulty remembering
information and concentrating with
reduced accuracy in work performance.
Students have trouble completing
homework and adults arrive home from
work with extreme fatigue and lack of
energy to engage in family and household
activities.
Complex visual environments elevate
symptoms of headache, head pressure,
dizziness and imbalance, and can cause
anxiety. Over time people tend to
withdraw from outings and can become
depressed from the inability to perform
routine daily activities. Crowded places
are difficult to navigate because of the
movement of people and complex visual
background in the observer’s perpheral vision
these visual distractions cause a sense of imbalance and
dizziness, often with head pressure that can ead to panic attacks
or avoidance of activity.
HOW CAN I BEST COPE WITH
Symptoms Of Concussion?
The best treatment for symptoms of
concussion involves an assessment of
Vestibular function by a Physical therapist..
A comprehensive vestibular
evaluation should include examination of
balance activities that involve the
vestibular, vision and proprioceptive
systems, which reveals how the brain
interprets movement of the body and
head relative to space and the visual
suround. A cervical examination
determines if neck sprain or dizziness.
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What is the difference between Anxiety and Depression?

Dysthymia (dis-THIE-me-uh) is a mild but long-term (chronic) form of depression. Symptoms usually last for at least two years, and often for much longer than that. Dysthymia interferes with your ability to function and enjoy life.

With dysthymia, you may lose interest in normal daily activities, feel hopeless, lack productivity, and have low self-esteem and an overall feeling of inadequacy. People with dysthymia are often thought of as being overly critical, constantly complaining and incapable of having fun.

Symptoms

Dysthymia symptoms in adults may include:

  • Loss of interest in daily activities
  • Sadness or feeling down
  • Hopelessness
  • Tiredness and lack of energy
  • Low self-esteem, self-criticism or feeling incapable
  • Trouble concentrating and trouble making decisions
  • Irritability or excessive anger
  • Decreased activity, effectiveness and productivity
  • Avoidance of social activities
  • Feelings of guilt and worries over the past
  • Poor appetite or overeating
  • Sleep problems

Dysthymia symptoms usually come and go over a period of years, and their intensity can change over time. But typically symptoms don’t disappear for more than two months at a time. In general, you may find it hard to be upbeat even on happy occasions — you may be described as having a gloomy personality.

When dysthymia starts before age 21, it’s called early-onset dysthymia. When it starts after that, it’s called late-onset dysthymia.

When to see a doctor

It’s perfectly normal to feel sad or upset sometimes or to be unhappy with stressful situations in your life. But with dysthymia, these feelings last for years and interfere with your relationships, work and daily activities.

Because these feelings have gone on for such a long time, you may think they’ll always be part of your life. But if you have any symptoms of dysthymia, seek medical help. If not effectively treated, dysthymia commonly progresses into major depression. Sometimes, a major depression episode occurs in addition to dysthymia — this is called double depression.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

It’s normal to feel anxious from time to time, especially if your life is stressful. However, excessive, ongoing anxiety and worry that interfere with day-to-day activities may be a sign of generalized anxiety disorder.

It’s possible to develop generalized anxiety disorder as a child or an adult. Generalized anxiety disorder has symptoms that are similar to panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and other types of anxiety, but they’re all different conditions.

Living with generalized anxiety disorder can be a long-term challenge. In many cases, it occurs along with other anxiety or mood disorders. In most cases, generalized anxiety disorder improves with medications or talk therapy (psychotherapy). Making lifestyle changes, learning coping skills and using relaxation techniques also can help

Generalized anxiety disorder symptoms can vary. They may include:

  • Persistent worrying or obsession about small or large concerns that’s out of proportion to the impact of the event
  • Inability to set aside or let go of a worry
  • Inability to relax, restlessness, and feeling keyed up or on edge
  • Difficulty concentrating, or the feeling that your mind “goes blank”
  • Worrying about excessively worrying
  • Distress about making decisions for fear of making the wrong decision
  • Carrying every option in a situation all the way out to its possible negative conclusion
  • Difficulty handling uncertainty or indecisiveness

Physical signs and symptoms may include:

  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Muscle tension or muscle aches
  • Trembling, feeling twitchy
  • Being easily startled
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Sweating
  • Nausea, diarrhea or irritable bowel syndrome
  • Headaches

There may be times when your worries don’t completely consume you, but you still feel anxious even when there’s no apparent reason. For example, you may feel intense worry about your safety or that of your loved ones, or you may have a general sense that something bad is about to happen.

Your anxiety, worry or physical symptoms cause you significant distress in social, work or other areas of your life. Worries can shift from one concern to another and may change with time and age.

Symptoms in children and teenagers

In addition to the symptoms above, children and teenagers who have generalized anxiety disorder may have excessive worries about:

  • Performance at school or sporting events
  • Being on time (punctuality)
  • Earthquakes, nuclear war or other catastrophic events

A child or teen with generalized anxiety disorder may also:

  • Feel overly anxious to fit in
  • Be a perfectionist
  • Redo tasks because they aren’t perfect the first time
  • Spend excessive time doing homework
  • Lack confidence
  • Strive for approval
  • Require a lot of reassurance about performance

When to see a doctor

Some anxiety is normal, but see your doctor if:

  • You feel like you’re worrying too much, and it’s interfering with your work, relationships or other parts of your life
  • You feel depressed, have trouble with drinking or drugs, or you have other mental health concerns along with anxiety
  • You have suicidal thoughts or behaviors — seek emergency treatment immediately

Your worries are unlikely to simply go away on their own, and they may actually get worse over time. Try to seek professional help before your anxiety becomes severe — it may be easier to treat early on.

 The good news is with both these disorders is there is help, it can be medications, meditation,Journaling,  behavior therapy, mindfulness, exercise, seeing a counselor.   You can live a life with these disorders.

 

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Tinnitus and the cause!

Now We Know What Causes Tinnitus, That Never-Ending Ringing In Your Ears

Written by

Kari Paul

Contributor

Chronic pain and tinnitus, the incessant ear ringing that affects up to 30 percent of the adult population, may share a common source, new research shows. The finding may bring millions of people who suffer from both conditions a step closer to finding relief.

A study published in Trends in Cognitive Sciences found the “phantom pain” in both disorders often begins as a response to an injury, but continues when a faulty “circuit breaker” in the brain is unable to properly process the pain or noise.

Josef Rauschecker, director of the Laboratory for Integrative Neuroscience and Cognition at GUMC and one of the study’s authors, said the discovery is good news for those affected by both conditions. As of now, neither have direct treatments.

“The next step is ‘how could this be used for finding a cure?’” he said. “That is of course the challenge, but we are hoping to make some progress in the next 5-10 years.”

Rauschecker said brain imaging studies of tinnitus patients showed the condition was related to higher cognitive and affective brain systems. Meanwhile, separate researchers discovered the same mechanism was involved in chronic pain. Neuroscientists at Georgetown University Medical Center and Germany’s Technische Universität München brought the research together for this paper, published in Trends in Cognitive Sciences.

“This is an amazingly rare occurrence of two fields independently coming to the same conclusion,” Rauschecker said.

In the study, researchers traced stimuli through the brain using MRI technology. They compared tinnitus patients with those who did not have tinnitus and found volume loss in the medial prefrontal cortex, an area that plays a role in the limbic system and functions as a “gate” or control area for noise and pain signals that is also associated with depression.

“We expected to find changes in the auditory system, but what really stood out was this significant volume loss in this part of the mPFC,” he said. “This is an area that also lights up when you play unpleasant noises, so it has to do with unpleasant sensations. It was not expected to see something there, but it fit well with previous findings.”

They found the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens are part of a “gatekeeping” system that determines which sounds or other stimuli to admit. When the system is defective, affected patients can be subjected to constant stimuli and long-lasting disturbances.

The area is also associated with depression and anxiety, conditions often arise “in lockstep” with chronic pain. Because of this, the researchers are now looking to drugs that regulate that system, like dopamine and serotonin, to restore the gatekeeping role and eliminate the chronic pain, but more research is needed.

“These are disorders that affect us every day, and many millions have them but we won’t be able to cure them unless we understand how they work,” Rauschecker said.

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Anxiety

Know when to seek help for anxiety.

Behavioral HealthA fierce dog barks at you, or lightning strikes a tree near your house. Your heart seems to jump into your mouth, your hands begin to sweat and your stomach hurts, too. In short, you feel anxious.

Most of the time, feeling anxious doesn’t mean there’s anything wrong with you. When you feel anxious at appropriate times, these uncomfortable feelings may prompt you to call animal control about the dog running loose or to go indoors during a storm.

However, anxiety can become counterproductive, and, when it does, it’s time to find mental and physical relief. Symptoms of ongoing anxiety include being easily startled, breathlessness, constant worrying, frequent urination, headaches, sleeplessness, sweating, tension and inability to relax, trembling, upset stomach and even hot flashes.

If constant worries are ruining your sense of well-being, try these coping strategies.

  • Breathe. Deep breathing from your diaphragm may help symptoms recede. Breathe deep into your belly—place your hand above your navel to feel your stomach expand. Then breathe out, tightening your abdominal muscles. Repeat slowly.
  • Speak gently to yourself. Known as “positive self-talk,” messages such as “this too shall pass” or a favorite line of inspirational verse may reduce your anxiety.
  • Calm your body. Plentiful, regular sleep, frequent exercise and gradual reduction of alcohol and caffeine in your diet may help reduce anxiety.

Seek Sound Advice

Sometimes, people find that their anxiety is persistent. If you feel worried much of the time for six months or more, or if you cannot control your anxiety symptoms even when you try, visit a health provider such as a doctor or counselor. He or she may teach you behavioral strategies or prescribe medications to help you. Many insurance plans now cover behavioral health screenings at no cost.

Unmask Anxiety Mimics

“It’s just stress. I’ll feel better in a little while.”

When you feel your chest flutter or your breath quicken, you may be tempted to dismiss the symptoms, especially if you know you suffer from anxiety from time to time. However, serious medical conditions may present with the same signs as anxiety attacks.

  • Atrial fibrillation (A-fib). Your heart may race up to 250 beats a minute during a panic attack or when you have atrial fibrillation. However, A-fib is a physical condition that can damage the heart.
  • Heart attacks in women may share anxiety symptoms, including nausea and sweating. For any chest pain or other possible heart symptoms, seek emergency care.
  • Hyperthyroidism. Symptoms may include nervousness, sleeplessness and heart arrhythmia. Patients may also have muscle weakness or weight loss despite healthy eating. Ask your doctor for a thyroid test if you don’t think an anxiety diagnosis covers all your symptoms.

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