Tag Archives: exercise

Natural ways to cure heartburn.

According to estimates by the American College of Gastroenterology, around 15 millions Americans suffer from daily heartburn. These individuals may also suffer from Gastroesophageal reflux disease, or ‘GERD.’ GERD is diagnosed if an individual reports experiencing acid reflux more than twice per week.

Per Medical News Today, here are some other noteworthy facts on heartburn:
– Causes of heartburn include smoking, obesity, lack of exercise, poor diet, and certain underlying medical conditions.
– The primary symptom is a burning sensation in the chest or throat from stomach acid.
– Most commonly, heartburn has little influence on overall health.
– Treatments include antacids and proton-pump inhibitors (‘PPI’ medicine.)
Medical experts consider occasional heartburn to be natural and not a cause for concern.

Other Symptoms
As mentioned, the most common symptom is a burning sensation in the upper chest and throat. These sensations are attributable to the presence of stomach acid.
Other reported symptoms: jaw pain, abdominal discomfort and burning, and acid-like taste in the mouth.
Here are five natural remedies for heartburn:

1. Baking Soda
Straight up, baking soda is a miracle product. One of its uses – actually, its main use – is as an antacid! Baking soda made up of 100 percent sodium bicarbonate; a slightly salty tasting, alkaline white powder. Baking soda relieves heartburn, acid indigestion, and sour stomach by counteracting excess stomach acid.
How to: Dissolve 1/2 teaspoon into a 4-ounce glass of water, or a full teaspoon in one 8-ounce glass. Repeat every two hours until heartburn is gone.
2. Bananas
Bananas have a high pH level, which is vital to restoring gastric acidity to its natural state. A banana’s texture is also great for relieving discomfort of the esophagus, according to gastroenterologist Gerard E. Mullin, MD.

How to: If you’re not a big fan of ‘nanas by themselves, slice half of a banana and add it to your morning oatmeal or cereal. You can also slice a banana and add a pinch of cinnamon powder and sugar (a pinch!).
3. Ginger
Ginger is one of the best-known natural stomach soothers around. Ginger has a few benefits concerning acid reflux; its anti-inflammatory properties are especially helpful. Inflammation of the esophagus is a key symptom of those with acid reflux troubles.
How to: Ginger is quite a versatile food; it can be diced, peeled, shaved, or sliced. It can be eaten raw or added as an ingredient for salad, soup, sushi, and other foods. Perhaps the best way to enjoy ginger when it comes to heartburn is steeping it in water to make ginger tea.
Here’s a simple ginger tea recipe.

Click this image for the Ginger Tea Recipe
4. Chewing Gum
While this advice may sound a bit strange, chewing gum stimulates saliva production – a natural acid buffer. Besides producing saliva, chewing gum often makes us swallow more often and pushes acids back out of the esophagus.
How to: Well, there’s not much to popping a piece of gum into your mouth and chewing. A couple pieces of advice, however: choose sugar-free gum and avoid peppermint-flavored gum. Also, don’t swallow gum as it may irritate the lining of your stomach.
5. Herbs
Per WebMD, the following herbs have demonstrated some heartburn-relieving properties: dandelion root, elm bark powder/slippery elm, euonymous bark, holy thistle herb, ginger rhizome, gentian root, meadowsweet herb, myrrh resin, lemon balm leaf, valerian root, southern prickly ash berries, oat seed.
How to: Nowadays, most herbs are sold as supplements or as standalone items. On this note, some supplements are thought to interact with certain prescription medications, so be sure to check with your doctor. The same applies if you have an underlying medical condition.
Preventative Measures
There are plenty of lifestyle changes that may reduce the production of stomach acid. Here are a few:
– avoid smoking
– exercise regularly
– drink plenty of fresh water
– do not eat lying down
– eat a well-balanced diet
– eat smaller, more frequent meals
– limit heavy lifting and straining
– limit and monitor potential ‘trigger foods,’ including: alcohol, caffeine, citrus fruits, milk and dairy products, soft drinks, carbonated juices, tomatoes.
– lose weight if overweight or obese
– review prescription medications with your doctor

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A new Diagnosis

As the last 2 days have set in my mind, a blurred diagnosis, with blurred game plan, what it all means, what’s the next step, I just keep hearing this is abnormal, this is abnormal, this is abnormal ect. I don’t think Doctors realize it’s a lot to take in in a 15 minute appointment.

After crying in the parking lot, I realized that was getting me no where. I needed to help myself, The Doctors are not going to help me through this. It must be me. I have to do research on treatment, diet, exercise, medications, everything involved.

But I feel like a cake adding one layer on top of layer of diagnosis. When does the top come on. So for me, I have hard a really two days of just pure fatigue, but I went swimming anyway, Did some art, and cried a lot. Now I had my sympathy party and now it’s kick butt time. Those who know me, know I must help others in my same place. So that’s a given. I am thankful for my journaling class beginning next week, I am going clean in my diet, green in my house, exercise no matter how hard it is. Drink tons of water to help my liver and kidneys. I am also grateful for the friends that have contacted me to check in, David Morrill, Frank Covert, Karen Polly, Tracy Fox, Amanda Parks,, Kristina Greaney, Bonnie Burgess Barbara Suiter, Lindsay Gauger, and Kathy Merrill, Russ Brean Holly Kelly, Jennifer Pokorski, Holly Torgeson and my new dear friend DA Cole, your support means everything.

So just so you know, I am kicking butt mood and I am going to win. Kelly

Thanks for all your support, love and friendship,

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Preventing cold and flu.

The Myers Way® Approach to Preventing the Cold & Flu

November 20th, 2015

Flu

The Myers Way® Approach to Preventing the Cold & Flu

 

Flu season is well underway, and I’ve received lots of questions on The Myers Way® Community Forum about how to avoid the flu and stay well this winter. This is an important question, as getting sick can can stress your immune system, increasing your risk of developing an autoimmune disease or a flare up in a condition you already have. Getting a cold or the flu can also often lead to taking antibiotics which are typically unnecessary (since the cold and flu are both caused by viruses) and can damage your gut.

 

10 Tips for Supporting Your Immune System and Preventing the Flu Naturally

Ensuring a strong foundation of health and following simple best practices will go a long way in decreasing your risk of getting the flu. Here are ten tips for staying healthy this flu season.

 

1. Wash Your Hands Frequently and Thoroughly
This is the number one way to prevent the flu and other respiratory infections. You must scrub your hands thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds in order to kill viruses. Twenty seconds is about how long it takes to sing the ABC’s one time through. Do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth without first washing your hands.

 

2. Heal Your Gut
Your gut is your gateway to health, 80% of your immune system is located in your gut. Make sure your gut is in tip-top shape, and take a high-quality, multi-strain probiotic with at least 25 billion units.

 

3. Reduce Alcohol and Sugar Consumption
Even moderate alcohol consumption suppresses the central nervous system, and therefore your immune system. Consuming too much sugar can suppress the immune system and make it more difficult for your body to fight off infections like the flu.

 

4. Reduce Your Stress
Stress is known to suppress our immune systems. Consider meditation, yoga, or acupuncture. See additional relaxation tips and learn about my favorite ways to relieve stress in this article.

 

5. Get 7-9 Hours of Sleep Every Night
Your body relies on sleep to recuperate from daily exposure to toxins. Chronic sleep deprivation can significantly reduce immune function.

 

6. Supplement with Glutathione, Turmeric, and Vitamin C
Antioxidants are very important for your immune function. Glutathione is the chief antioxidant in your body, responsible for enhancing your immune system and helping your liver with detoxification. Curcumin is the orange pigment in turmeric and a potent antioxidant that improves joint health and cardiovascular function. Vitamin C provides potent antioxidant protection, and supports optimal immune function

 

7. Take an Immune Booster
Give your immune system an added boost with some immunoglobulins and protein, I carry immune boost capsules in my store.

 

8. Optimize Vitamin D
Vitamin D is a powerful immune system modulator. Optimal levels range from 50 to 70 ng/mL. For many, that can mean taking 5,000 IU per day; however, I recommend working with a physician to regularly monitor your levels if you are taking a Vitamin D supplement.

 

9. Consider a Zinc Supplement
Zinc is another powerful antioxidant that plays a crucial role in immune health. Within the immune system, zinc is needed for gene regulation and the functioning of neutrophils, natural killer cells, and lymphocytes, which are all types of white blood cells.

 

10. Get Plenty of Exercise
Exercise can boost your immune system by increasing your circulation and relieving stress. Increased circulation allows antibodies to travel throughout your bloodstream faster, making it easier for your immune system to fight off an illness. Exercise can also enhance your immune system by relieving stress and slowing the release of stress hormones in the body.

 

Supporting your immune system, strengthening your gut health, and remaining rested and stress-free are not only the keys to preventing the flu, they are an integral part of The Myers Way®, and will keep you on the path to optimal health.

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Living with Type 1 Diabetes

Living With Type 1 Diabetes

You’ve just been told you have type 1 diabetes. What now?

At its core, proper type 1 diabetes management is composed of a handful of elements: blood glucose control and insulin management, exercise, nutrition and support.

Medication

A diagnosis of type 1 diabetes means your pancreas is no longer capable of producing insulin. Through multiple daily injections with insulin pens or syringes or an insulin pump, it will be up to you to monitor your blood glucose levels and appropriately administer your insulin. You will need to work closely with your healthcare team to determine which insulin or insulins are best for you and your body.

Learn more:

Exercise

Exercise is also a key component of proper diabetes care. Along with all of the other benefits you will receive from being active, your diabetes will also respond in kind with more stable blood glucose levels. We have plenty of information and tips to help get you motivated and keep your exercise routines fresh.

Learn more:

Nutrition

Nutrition is one of the most important pieces of the diabetes puzzle. Understanding how different foods affect your blood glucose and learning to develop solid meal plans will be a crucial part of your daily routine.

Learn more:

– See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/recently-diagnosed/living-with-type-1-diabetes.html#sthash.NKGiMiZZ.dpuf

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