Tag Archives: Fibromyalgia

Lymphatic Massage! Who should have it done ?

Lymphatic massage, also called lymphatic drainage or manual lymph drainage, is a technique developed in Germany for treatment of lymphedema, an accumulation of fluid that can occur after lymph nodes are removed during surgery, most often a mastectomy for breast cancer. Lymphedema can also be present at birth or develop at puberty or during adulthood. This type, known as primary lymphedema, can affect as many as four limbs and/or other parts of the body. The cause is unknown. Lymphatic drainage massage for conditions other than lymphedema is not medically recommended, although it may be promoted by some therapists.
What conditions is lymphatic massage used for?

Up to 25 percent of breast cancer patients whose surgery includes removal of lymph nodes in the area of the armpit eventually develop lymphedema. The condition can also occur in the legs or other parts of the body if lymph nodes are removed in the course of other types of surgery – for melanoma, colon, prostate or bladder cancer, for example – or are damaged by radiation treatment, infection or trauma. Symptoms include swelling and pain near the site of the removed or damaged lymph nodes. Lymphedema can occur immediately after radiation therapy or surgery, or weeks, months, and even years later.
What should one expect on a visit to a practitioner of lymphatic massage?

A lymphatic massage session for women who develop lymphedema after surgery for breast cancer starts with light massage on the surface of the skin of the neck. The therapist gently rubs, strokes, taps or pushes the skin in directions that follow the structure of the lymphatic system so that accumulated lymph fluid can drain through proper channels. Lymphatic drainage is very gentle, is not painful and doesn’t have a stimulating effect. Each session lasts from 45 to 60 minutes, and therapy usually is performed once a day four or five times a week for two to four weeks. One study showed that the greatest reduction in swelling from lymphedema occurs in the first week of treatment and stabilizes during the second week.
Are there any side effects or conditions where lymphatic massage should be avoided?

The National Lymphedema Network lists four circumstances under which lymphatic massage or drainage should be avoided:

When patients who have developed lymphedema after surgery experience a sudden, marked increase in localized swelling. Under these circumstances, patients are advised to stop treatment and to see their physicians for evaluation as soon as possible.
Patients with a sudden onset of lymphangitis (an infection) should immediately discontinue treatment until the infection is treated and completely clears up. Patients who are at increased risk for blood clotting should be tested to rule out deep-venous thrombosis before being treated. During treatment, these patients should be followed closely, and testing should be performed on a regular basis.
Patients who have congestive heart failure must be monitored closely to avoid moving too much fluid too quickly, which could put a strain on the heart.
When pain is present, treatment should be discontinued until the underlying cause has been determined and the pain subsides.

Is there a governing body that oversees or credentials practitioners of lymphatic massage?

Lymphatic drainage and massage practitioners may be physicians, nurses, physical or occupational therapists or massage therapists. In addition to their traditional course work, most require additional instruction in lymphedema therapy. Guidelines for training have been established by the Lymphology Association of North America, which administers certification examinations.

How does one get in touch with a practitioner of lymphatic massage?

To find a therapist skilled in lymphatic massage, visit the National Lymphedema Network website. Your physician may also be able to recommend someone who treats lymphedema and provides lymphatic massage.

Are there other therapies that might work well in conjunction with lymphatic massage?

In addition to lymphatic massage, patients may be advised to do self-massage following instructions from their therapists, as well as special light exercises designed to encourage the flow of lymphatic fluid out of the affected limb. Some patients may also be advised wear compression garments such as long sleeves or stockings designed to compress the arm or leg and encourage lymphatic flow out of the limb.

Other recommended therapies for lymphedema may include wrapping the affected limb to encourage the fluid to flow back out of the limb into the trunk, or pneumatic compression which involves wearing a sleeve over the affected arm and leg that is connected to a pump that intermittently inflates it, putting gentle pressure on the arm or leg and thereby moving the lymph fluid away from the fingers and toes and reducing swelling. The combination of these therapies plus lymphatic massage is called complete decongestant therapy (CDT). This approach usually is not recommended for patients with high blood pressure, diabetes, paralysis, heart failure, blood clots or acute infections.
What is Dr. Weil’s view of lymphatic massage?

Dr. Weil believes that lymphatic massage is a worthwhile treatment for lymphedema, but he emphasizes that individuals who do not have lymphedema do not need lymphatic drainage, no matter what health claims are made for it. He notes that some internet sites warn of the health consequences of “sluggish lymphatic flow” and promote lymphatic drainage for all manner of supposed benefits ranging from detoxification of the body, regeneration of burned, injured or wrinkled tissue, anti-aging effects, and relief of sinusitis, bronchitis, ear infections, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, constipation, insomnia, memory loss, cellulite, and obesity. He also says he has seen lymphatic drainage promoted as a beauty treatment. However, Dr. Weil has not seen good evidence supporting any of these effects of manual lymphatic drainage. Dr. Weil emphasizes that manual lymphatic drainage is not a necessity for general health and explains that lymph fluid circulates as result of muscular contraction, including the muscles used during normal physical activity. As long as long as your lymphatic tissues or lymph nodes have not been damaged or removed, Dr. Weil maintains that that there is no need to worry about lymphatic flow and drainage.

Did you like this? Share it:

Chronically Ill Patients will no longer Apologize because they are sick.

I’ve Decided I’m No Longer Apologizing for What I Can’t Do Because of My Illnesses

I am disabled. It wasn’t until this year that I started to accept that, and realize that my illness (or rather illnesses) is here to stay. This year I was diagnosed with a systemic autoimmune disease known as Sjogren’s syndrome.

I won’t lie, this illness is a cruel one. I honestly don’t know how I’m going to feel from one day to the next. I had a hunch a few years ago that I probably had an autoimmune disease since my entire body seemed to be under attack. I’ve been diagnosed with illnesses like interstitial cystitis and fibromyalgia, but I didn’t want to believe that I couldn’t cure them. I tried every remedy I could, but over time my health was only getting worse. I was angry that no matter how much willpower I had or how much money I spent, I couldn’t get well. I was angry at other people for being able to take their health for granted. Most of all, I was angry at myself for the guilt I felt and the need to apologize over and over again for being sick.

I recently decided that I will no longer be apologizing for not being able to do what I was once able to. Saying the words “I’m sorry” implies that I have control over my debilitating symptoms. I think we carry this guilt with chronic illness because we feel we’ve somehow brought it on ourselves. I can no longer apologize or feel guilty for not being able to make plans, or for being unable to work, or even brush my hair sometimes. It’s not my fault. I spent so much time trying to convey what it’s like to be ill to others, and I avoided the fact that I wasn’t willing to accept my limitations. I refused to believe it wasn’t going to get better.

Now, for my sanity, I have to mourn my former life and simply let it go. I’m releasing that energy into the universe so it no longer weighs me down. I know firsthand that chronic illness can break your heart over and over again, and there’ll be days when you feel as though the loneliness will shatter you into a million pieces, but I would like to remind you that it’s not your fault. I know that you’re simply doing the best you can.

I didn’t want to accept how sick I was because it felt like giving up, when in reality learning to accept my limitations and let go of the guilt has been the best thing for me. It’s allowing me to start over.

I’d like to believe that I’ve been given this illness for a reason. Whether it’s to educate people about this disease, or to learn a lesson about myself, or hell maybe it’s just that I’m tough enough to take the beating. Whatever the reason, I’m learning to embrace it. Who knows, maybe I’m turning into a superhero. I mean, my body does do things that a “normal” body doesn’t,
That’s it Im a superhero.
Written by Amber Hosea from the Mighty Chronincally Ill.

Did you like this? Share it:

Eight common warning signs of Gluten Intolerance!

Eight Common Warning Signs Of Gluten Intolerance
By Barbara Diamond

Sure, the word “gluten” has become somewhat of a buzzword lately — but gluten intolerance isn’t just a fad.

Despite what many people may think, gluten intolerance isn’t a food allergy and does not signify celiac disease. Rather, it’s a condition in your gut, and it can have a negative impact on one’s overall lifestyle and well-being.

According to Food Renegade, “undigested gluten proteins (prevalent in wheat and other grains) hang out in your intestines and are treated by your body like a foreign invader, irritating your gut and flattening the microvilli along the small intestine wall. Without those microvilli, you have considerably less surface area with which to absorb the nutrients from your food.”

We know that debilitating pain, vomiting, and diarrhea after eating are surefire signs of a serious gastrointestinal condition — but when looking at gluten intolerance, many of these universal signs may sound quite general and vague. However, those who remain undiagnosed may continue to eat gluten for the rest of their lives, putting themselves at risk for autoimmune and other diseases, along with a wide array of exhausting, frustrating, and uncomfortable symptoms.

Scroll down to see eight common signs of gluten intolerance, and please make sure to consult your doctor if you’re experiencing severe forms of any of the following symptoms.

Image Credit: DIY Network
1. Stomach Pain
1. Stomach Pain
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

You know what they say: Listen to your gut.

Digestive issues are perhaps the most obvious sign of gluten intolerance. After eating foods containing gluten, you may often experience gas, bloating, diarrhea, and constipation. According to Digestion Relief Center, eating foods that contain gluten can damage the lining of the small intestine, and can lead to poor absorption of minerals, vitamins, and most of the food you eat.
2. Dizziness
2. Dizziness
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

Many people with gluten intolerance experience brain fog, disorientation, and a strange feeling of being off-balance after consuming foods made with gluten — but they fail to connect the dots.

That frequent feeling of cloudiness isn’t normal, and by eliminating gluten from your diet, you may feel that cloud lifted. Some people have actually seen a decrease in vertigo attacks after cutting gluten from their diet.
3. Mood Swings
3. Mood Swings
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

Think about it… If your gut is unhappy with the foods you eat, then your brain will be, too. People with gluten intolerance often find themselves unexplainably irritable, anxious, or upset.

The New England Journal of Medicine listed 55 diseases caused or exacerbated by eating gluten, which included depression and anxiety.
4. Chronic Migraine
4. Chronic Migraine
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

Headaches are highly common for people with gluten intolerance. While it’s not associated with one specific type of headache, the pattern typically occurs within 30 to 60 minutes after eating.

Frequent migraines can also lead to blurry vision and pain around the eye sockets.
5. Itchy Skin
5. Itchy Skin
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

When your intestines have trouble processing gluten, they become inflamed, which can outwardly “reveal” itself through the skin. That’s why gluten sensitivity is often associated to skin conditions, like eczema and psoriasis. The immune system responds to an unhappy digestive system by creating antibodies that can cause dry, itchy skin.

These symptoms may result in many sleepless nights spent scratching at your knees, elbows, fingers, and/or shins.
6. Fibromyalgia
6. Fibromyalgia
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition that causes widespread pain in your muscles, ligaments, and tendons. It affects about 4 percent of the U.S. population, and mostly women.

According to many health professionals, avoiding gluten can alleviate fibromyalgia. As Medicine Net reports, rheumatology experts like Alex Shikhman, M.D., believe the diversity of dietary approaches may have less to do with the impact on fibromyalgia, and more to do with treating a secondary, possibly undiagnosed illness. “When patients are helped by a specific dietary measure, it is often because of the presence of a secondary condition that does have a recognized response to diet. And when you take care of that, you do get some relief from all the symptoms. You feel better overall.”

Makes sense, right?
7. Chronic Fatigue
7. Chronic Fatigue
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

It also makes total sense that if your body is out of whack and your mind is up and down, you’d also feel tired and exhausted. Even if you get eight to nine hours of sleep, you may still wake up feeling drained; this can signify a much bigger problem.

When your body is always inflamed and spending its energy on trying to deal with unwanted gluten proteins, then your energy will be spent much quicker and easier than normal.
8. Lactose Intolerance
8. Lactose Intolerance
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

Gluten and dairy intolerance have very similar symptoms, and sometimes the two go hand-in-hand. This is probably the most surprising sign of gluten intolerance, but it’s a big one.

If lactose is already a dietary issue for you, then chances are gluten is, too. There’s a specific type of sugar found in milk and other dairy products that can trigger digestive issues and add on to the already uncomfortable symptoms of gluten intolerance. Dairy foods are also a common trigger for acid reflux, which is also linked to gluten intolerance.

Please SHARE this important information with all those who may have been experiencing symptoms!

Around The Web

powered by PubExchange

Did you like this? Share it:

What is Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/fibromyalgia really like?

Nobody Knows What Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Fibromyalgia is Really Like (Probably Not Even You)
By Dan Neuffer

When I first published my book and started my website, one of the most common bits of feedback I received was “This guy really understands what it’s like to have ME/CFS/Fibromyalgia”. Some of those responses were quite emotional!

Well, having been ill with it for nearly 7 years, of course I understood. And I, like everyone else, felt that amazing relief and validation when I first spoke to other people with the illness, even though it was very late in my journey, about 6-7 years after I first got ill.

There is something amazing in hearing someone else experience the same frustrations, the same injustices as you have. Because no matter how much you try to explain what you are going through, other people simply don’t truly understand. They cannot understand, because their whole frame of reference is on a completely different plane! What they describe as exhaustion or pain would often be like relief for us.

And nobody gets what’s it’s like to suffer day in day out, week in week out. Nobody gets how this affects you when months turns into years, NOBODY, probably not even YOU! That’s something I only realized long after recovering!

This was highlighted to me again recently, when I interviewed someone that I coached to recovery after 15 years of illness. We looked at some footage of himself discussing his illness and experience a couple years earlier, and he started to cry. When I asked him why, he explained how he could see the suffering he had been experiencing, he could see how he was trying to hold it all together back then.
Join Health Rising’s ME/CFS, FM and Chronic Pain Forums!

Share your pain, make friends, find new treatment options, check out recovery stories and more in the Health Rising ME/CFS, FM and Chronic Pain Forums here

But of course we feel we know how much we suffer. After all, we experience it every day, right? Well, I personally don’t think most people really realize the real extent of it, whilst they are still sick. Let me explain what I mean by sharing some of my own experience.

During my years with ME/CFS/Fibromyalgia, like most people, I tried my best to live some sort of normal life. And so on my ‘good’ days (when I was not experiencing a flare up), I would try to do the normal things that other people do with their families. One of these was going to a local amusement park SeaWorld, where the kids could enjoy the animals and the rides.

It was about a year after I had recovered, I had been very busy with work and doing some heavy duty work around the house, when we got tickets to visit SeaWorld again. I was very sore and tired that day, LIKE A NORMAL PERSON, due to the physical work around the house. As we spent our day having fun, doing all the usual things, it felt like it was my first time there. We just had such a great time with the kids, making every little experience like some grand adventure.

But as I walked that familiar ground of the park, including the queues, I suddenly realized the true extent of my suffering all those years. Because even though I was tired and sore from all the work around the house, the whole thing was of course completely easy. Easy to walk through the park, to line up, to enjoy! Easy to sit down, stand up, to check the map, everything was easy.

Sitting on a particular park bench, I suddenly felt a sense of déjà vu. I connected strongly with the emotions and feelings I had experienced all those times I visited in my sick years and as I did so, I felt a wave of emotion flooding over me. I realized just how hard it had been to do anything, even during my ‘good’ days. It was only the contrast of the ease of doing things now, that showed me the true depth of my difficulties during those years.

It was a strange feeling, as I kind of felt very sorry for ‘that person’, that former me who had dragged themselves around, looking every moment for some respite. “Where I can I sit down?” “What can I lean against?”. “What should I eat or drink to get through the day?” “How much longer until we go?” “How far do I have to walk next?”

There was little joy in any of that, I was suffering so severely by simply being out of the house. I realized that I had been so distracted by trying to hold things together back then, that by simply trying to cope all those years, I lost my frame of reference for what was reasonable.

I realized that I had pushed myself beyond anything that anybody would have thought was reasonable. If a healthy person suddenly experienced what I was experiencing back then, they would not drag themselves on trying to be normal, but would have lied down and maybe called an ambulance.

The question came up “Why did I push so hard?” I had worked so hard! I had tried so hard to maintain some semblance of normality – and it had cost me so much!

The realization of what I had gone through really hit home. I knew it was difficult in those years, but suddenly I had a whole new perspective about them and I felt a deep sense of grief about myself for having to suffer through all that.
Fibromyalgia Summit

This realization is not unique to me, I have seen it in many other people that recovered who were sick for longer periods of time.

I realized that if I could go back to when I was ill and speak to myself, I would say – “don’t try so hard Dan”. I would say “it’s OK not to be able to do things” – “it’s OK to just rest”.

I realized though, that I had given up any hope of significant improvement or recovery; that I thought that this, as bad as it was, was as good as it was going to get. If this was as good as it was going to get, if nothing was going to change, then I was going to do my best, even if it cost me greatly, to lead as much of a normal life as I could. The pull to maintain any semblance of normalcy was terribly strong.

It’s not just the physical stress. It’s also the mental stress; the worrying about how it will turn out; the fear that I might get worse or might never get better – the fear that I might be this way for the rest of my life.

If I had known that recovery was possible, though, if I had known that there was an end in sight, then perhaps I would have given myself more of a break. Like when you have the flu, you just take a time out.

But when you think there is no end in sight – you just push on don’t you? And as you do so, over time, many (if not all) of us simply lose perspective of what normal is. We get so focused on holding it together and doing what we can and trying to get well, that we never get the opportunity to step back and look at our experience objectively. Most of the people I have spoken to, seem to only realize the full extent of their experience after they have recovered.

But if you really feel like you are in the doldrums right now, then perhaps your best step forward is first to find a way to feel a little better, a little more hope and to feel a little more able to cope. And reaching out to a counselor or friend may be your first step.

Having lived with the illness for years myself and having seen others get stuck in these awful low places, I wrote a little book called Discover Hope : 34 Steps To Find Hope and To Cope with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & Fibromyalgia. It’s a short easy to read book that could help you find a more positive place from which you can hopefully start taking action to improve your health and your life. So if you’re feeling a bit low, then hopefully it can give you a little boost and help you change your perspective.

The book can be read on any computer device using the kindle reading apps, and is available for free from time to time from Amazon (currently free from 12th May 16 to 14th May 16, you can check the link to confirm the next free dates).

Simply check my website here for more details on how to get it.

Like the blog? Make sure you don’t miss the latest on ME/CFS and FM treatment and research news by registering for our free ME/CFS and Fibromyalgia blog here.

Did you like this? Share it:

What is an Invisible Disability?

What is an Invisible Disability?
Invisible Disabilities Association – InvisibleDisabilities.org

By Guest Blogger Wayne Connell, Founder, Invisible Disabilities Association

What is an “invisible disability?” Is it a specific illness or condition, such as multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, bipolar disorder, diabetes, a Chiari malformation or syringomyelia? Is it the symptoms of an illness or disability, such as pain or fatigue or neuropathy or brain fog? Why do we even use the phrase or where did it come from? Isn’t a disability just a disability, no matter if you can see it or not? Are people treated differently because their disability manifests itself visibly? Is having a disability different from being disabled? All great questions! Is someone, who has an illness or is in pain or has a disability or is disabled, a bad person who should be treated like a lesser human? I can answer that one. NO!

Twenty years ago in 1996, my wife, Sherri, coined the term “invisible disability.” Why did she come up with it? After receiving a diagnosis of primary progressive multiple sclerosis and chronic late stage Lyme disease in 1991, at the young age of 27, Sherri endured the stares and accusations and disbelief of strangers and friends that questioned how she could be disabled and still walk with seemingly unapparent outward signs of her disabilities. People would often scream at her when she parked in an accessible space or ignore her when she collapsed on the floor of a department store. So the phrase, “I have an invisible disability,” became an apt description of what she was living with.

As a tech guy, I decided to use some of Sherri’s pamphlets she wrote to help friends and family better understand what she was going through such as “Multiple What? Untangling the Perplexities of Multiple Sclerosis” and “Don’t Judge by Appearances – Parking with Invisible Disabilities” and created the InvisibleDisabilities.org website. That is when The Invisible Disabilities Advocate® was launched (which became the Invisible Disabilities® Association (IDA)). Almost immediately, 25,000 people a month started coming to IDA’s website and said that we put into words what they had been trying to tell their friends and families. “Invisible disabilities” progressed from a very descriptive term to an international organization and movement.

Of course, the question most-asked of our organization is, “what is an ‘invisible disability?’” In general, the term “disability” is often used to describe an ongoing physical challenge. This could be a bump in life that can be well-managed or a mountain that creates serious changes and loss. Either way, this term should not be used to describe a person as weaker or lesser than anyone else! Every person has a purpose, special uniqueness and value, no matter what hurdles they may face.

In addition, just because a person has a disability does not mean they are disabled. Many living with these challenges are still fully active in their work, families, sports or hobbies. Some with disabilities are able to work full or part time, but struggle to get through their day, with little or no energy for other things. Others are unable to maintain gainful or substantial employment due to their disability, have trouble with daily living activities and/or need assistance with their care.

According to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), an individual with a disability is a person who: has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities; has a record of such an impairment; or is regarded as having such an impairment.

Furthermore, “A person is considered to have a disability if he or she has difficulty performing certain functions (seeing, hearing, talking, walking, climbing stairs and lifting and carrying), or has difficulty performing activities of daily living, or has difficulty with certain social roles (doing school work for children, working at a job and around the house for adults).”

Often people think the term “disability” only refers to people using a wheelchair or walker. On the contrary, the 1994-1995 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) found that 26 million Americans (almost one in 10) were considered to have a severe disability, while only 1.8 million used a wheelchair and 5.2 million used a cane, crutches or walker. In other words, 74 percent of Americans who live with a severe disability do not use such devices. Therefore, a disability cannot be determined solely on whether or not a person uses assistive equipment.

The term “invisible disability” refers to symptoms such as debilitating pain, fatigue, dizziness, cognitive dysfunctions, brain injuries, learning differences and mental health disorders, as well as hearing and vision impairments. These are not always obvious to the onlooker, but can sometimes or always limit daily activities, range from mild challenges to severe limitations and vary from person to person.

Also, someone who has a visible impairment or uses an assistive device such as a wheelchair, walker or cane can also have an invisible disability. For example, whether or not a person utilizes an assistive device, if they are debilitated by such symptoms as described above, they live with an invisible disability.

Unfortunately, people often judge others by what they see and often conclude a person can or cannot do something by the way they look. This can be equally frustrating for those who may appear unable, but are perfectly capable, as well as those who appear able, but are not.

International Disability expert Joni Eareckson Tada explained it well when she told someone living with debilitating fatigue, “people have such high expectations of folks like you [with invisible disabilities], like, ‘come on, get your act together.’ But they have such low expectations of folks like me in wheelchairs, as though it’s expected that we can’t do much.”

The bottom line is that everyone with a disability is different, with varying challenges and needs, as well as abilities and attributes. Thus, we all should learn to listen with our ears, instead of judging with our eyes.

At the Invisible Disabilities® Association, we do not maintain a list of specific illnesses and diagnoses that are considered invisible disabilities. There are thousands of illnesses, disorders, diseases, dysfunctions, genetic defects, impairments and injuries that can be debilitating. Therefore, all conditions that are debilitating are included when we talk about invisible disabilities. However, our focus is not to attempt to provide a vast amount of information about thousands of specific conditions (there are plenty of amazing organizations that do that).

IDA is here to provide awareness, education, connection and support for everyone who lives with a debilitating condition. We do this by offering articles, pamphlets, books, resources, radio interviews, video, seminars, symposiums and more to give hope and compassion to all living with invisible disabilities as well as information for loved ones to better understand.

IDA’s mission is to encourage, educate and connect people and organizations touched by illness, pain and disability around the globe. Hard to believe it has been twenty years yet there is still so much more work to do. Will you join us on this journey and envision a world where people living with illness, pain and disability will be Invisible No More®?
About the Guest Blogger

Wayne Connell, the founder and president of the Invisible Disabilities® Association (IDA), established IDA twenty years ago in 1996 out of the desire to educate friends and family about his wife’s debilitating illness. Soon afterwards, people around the globe began sending emails sharing how IDA had changed their relationships with their loved ones. He is co-author of the book, “But You LOOK Good, How to Encourage and Understand People Living with Illness and Pain.” Wayne’s background fueled his passion for helping people living with illness, pain and disability. His experience includes that of a professional, multitasking husband caregiver with an extensive background in management, media and technology. This man on a mission quickly launched IDA into a world-wide outreach for millions living with invisible disabilities.

Make sure you check out IDA’s website for additional resources and stories at www.InvisibleDisabilities.org. Share your personal video story with us at www.InvisibleNoMore.tv. You can also be part of other people’s stories by joining them at www.Facebook.com/invisibledisabilities or becoming a member of InvisibleDisabilities.Inspire.com. Join IDA at our 2nd annual Brain IDEAS Symposium on August 5th. Invisible Disabilities Week is Oct 16 through 22, 2016. Our 9th Annual Awards Gala, “Jazzed About You” will be Octob

Did you like this? Share it:

Just what is Fibromyalgia and the new treatments!!!!

Just what is Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia is a disorder that is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain. Many people can get confused about the actual meaning of a fibromyalgia diagnosis, thinking it is simply a ‘catchall’ type of diagnosis. This is not actually true. For example, rheumatoid arthritis is distinguished from other types of arthritis because of its specific symptoms. Fibromyalgia, however, is a syndrome, which means it has a specific set of symptoms that the person experiences as well as specific signs that a health care practitioner can identify. Learn from top health experts about the key factors behind fibromyalgia, the disorders


1 Trick To Fibromyalgia

See How to Relieve Fibromyalgia With This Fast and Easy Trick


potentially linked to it and more with these resources today:

Fibromyalgia is a specific, non-degenerative, chronic, non-inflammatory, non-progressive, true systemic pain condition. Disorders potentially linked to fibromyalgia include depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. Women are more likely to develop fibromyalgia and symptoms than are men. The symptoms of fibromyalgia frequently begin following a physical trauma, infection, surgery or a significant psychological stress. In some situations, the symptoms gradually accumulate over time and do not have a single triggering event. Many people who are diagnosed with fibromyalgia also have temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ), tension headaches, anxiety, depression and/or irritable bowel syndrome. The symptoms of fibromyalgia include: widespread pain, which is typically described as a continuous, dull ache that has lasted for three months. In order for the pain to be considered widespread, it must occur on both sides of the body as well as above and below the waist. Fatigue is a common symptom for those diagnosed with fibromyalgia. People with fibromyalgia often wake up tired, even after sleeping for long periods of time and their sleep is frequently disrupted by pain. Other sleep disorders have been noted as well, such as sleep apnea and/or restless legs syndrome. Another significant symptom is cognitive difficulties, which is often referred to as “fibro fog” as it impairs the ability to pay attention, focus and concentrate on mental tasks. Also depression, headaches, cramping and pain in their lower abdomen have been known to occur.

It has not been determined what the exact cause of fibromyalgia is, but many health professionals believe it involves a variety of different factors working together. Some of the factors include; genetics, because fibromyalgia often runs in families, an infection may trigger or aggravate fibromyalgia and/or a physical or emotional trauma, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, which is been linked to fibromyalgia. There are number of theories relating to why fibromyalgia causes pain. For example, some researchers have reported that repeated nerve stimulations cause the brain of someone with fibromyalgia to change. The change involves an abnormal increase in the level of the neurotransmitters that signal pain to the brain. Also, the pain receptors in the brain appear to develop a type of memory of the pain, which it becomes more sensitive to, meaning it can lead to an overreaction of pain signals.

Key Factors Behind Fibromyalgia
The risk factors for fibromyalgia typically include; being a woman, having a relative also diagnosed with fibromyalgia and if you have a rheumatic disease, such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. It is often difficult to diagnose fibromyalgia and many people often go years before a diagnosis is made. Doctors previously checked 18 specific points on your body to see how many points were painful when firm pressure was applied. The current guidelines for diagnosing fibromyalgia no longer require this type of exam, instead the diagnosis can be made if you have had widespread pain for greater than three months and without an underlying medical condition that may be the cause of your pain. There are no specific lab tests that can be done to confirm the diagnosis of fibromyalgia, however, your doctor may run a variety of tests to rule out any other conditions that may have similar symptoms. For example, a blood test is typically done to check your complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and thyroid function.

In general, treatments for fibromyalgia include both medication and self-care. The emphasis is on minimizing symptoms and improving general health. No one treatment works for all symptoms.

There are a variety of medications that may be prescribed to help relieve the pain associated with fibromyalgia and to help improve sleep patterns. Some of the common types of medications include: over-the-counter pain relievers or your physician may prescribe pain relievers, such as tramadol. A narcotic is not usually prescribed for alleviating the pain of fibromyalgia because they can often lead to a dependence on the medication and may worsen the pain over time. Antidepressants are sometimes prescribed to help lower the fatigue and pain that is associated with fibromyalgia and anti-seizure medications may occasionally be prescribed to help reduce certain types of pain.

Many people who suffer with fibromyalgia find relieve for the pain as well as management for their stress, through alternative therapies. Some of the most common alternative therapies used to treat the symptoms of fibromyalgia include; massage therapy, meditation and or yoga. One of the most important things you can do to help relieve the symptoms of fibromyalgia is self-care. Self-care is essential to help avoid stress, overexertion and fatigue. It is critical that you get enough sleep, because fatigue is one of the primary symptoms of fibromyalgia. Regular exercise will help to decrease the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Daily exercise, such as stretching, walking, bicycling and swimming are excellent ways to help reduce your pain as well as help you sleep better at night. Although it is important to avoid overexertion, it is important to remain at least moderately active. You should also maintain a healthy lifestyle, which includes eating healthy, limiting your daily intake of caffeine and avoiding tobacco and alcohol.

For those suffering with fibromyalgia, the lack of sleep and the pain often interferes with the ability to function while at home or at work. Along with the fatigue and pain associated with fibromyalgia, you may also have to deal with the frustration that accompanies the disorder, because it is such a misunderstood diagnosis. This frustration many people feel may lead to anxiety and/or depression. So, it is essential to educate yourself on the disorder, which makes it helpful to provide your friends and family with more information about your diagnosis. There is currently no cure for fibromyalgia, but certain medications are often beneficial in helping to control the symptoms. It is also beneficial to recognize the fact that you are not alone. There are a number of organizations, such as the American Chronic Pain Association and the National Fibromyalgia Association that can help connect you with others who are experiencing the same problems and that will understand what you are going through.

I have fibro and its not easy to live with, specially since Doctor’s treat you like you are crazy, Somedays I feel like I have been hit by a semi truck, a dull ache everywhere, just keeps moving around, its hurt’s to be touched, poked or tickled. It’s not easy living with this disease, and I don’t want to take pain medications because they can do more harm than good, so for me, I have to be careful how much I do, know my limits, I found a 3 foot heating pad that is my best friend, hot baths every day with Epson salt. Try to not get my legs cold, not stand on hard surfaces for any length of time. changed all my shoes out. No more heals! Even certain fabric can hurt my skin, I have to be careful with that. So basically this disease really sucks, But I have tried to find ways to make it livable since it’s not curable. Kelly

Did you like this? Share it:

The Medical Medium and What’s potentially at the Root of Medical Mysteries.

The Medical Medium—and What’s Potentially at the Root of Medical Mysteries

In the forward to the new book, Medical Medium, Dr. Alejandro Junger writes, “As a man of science, I have been taught to the point of indoctrination that I must only trust what I can observe, measure, test, and reproduce.” But Dr. Junger then goes on to explain his career-long fascination with healers—those who can bring sight back through touch, or restore the mysteriously ailing to health. Sure, it sounds really out there, but one of the reasons we lean on Dr. Junger so heavily over here at goop is because he’s always willing to question the status quo—and to acknowledge that he might not have all the answers.

One of the unlikely places where Dr. Junger has found surprising—and according to him, spot-on—answers is from Anthony William, a self-titled Medical Medium, who has heard a force he calls Spirit in his ear since he was a toddler. As he recounts in his book, the vision of a man appeared at the dinner table one night when he was four-years-old and beckoned him to stand in front of his grandmother, put his hand on her chest, and say “lung cancer.” Plagued by curiosity, his parents took his grandmother to the doctor a few weeks later, and sure enough, she had a late stage lung cancer that had metastasized. And according to William, Spirit—though not visibly present—has been with him ever since.

William has a robust business—apparently the waiting list is years-long, half of his clients are doctors looking for advice on behalf of incurable patients, and he attends to callers by lottery—but he’s now put some of his foundational knowledge into a book, which he’s quick to point out has absolutely nothing in the way of medical study footnotes or citations. As he explains, “It’s all new.” The focus is on “mystery illnesses,” i.e., a group of diseases that many physicians have been quick to dismiss as psychosomatic—and which primarily affect women—including chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, Lyme disease, rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto’s, and Epstein-Barr virus. (More on EBV below.)

The book is a fascinating read, whether plausible or not. His personal story is compelling, and his discussion of disease and disease states is really interesting, even if you’re not personally affected. Below, you’ll find a chapter about Epstein-Barr Virus from William’s new book, Medical Medium: Secrets Behind Chronic and Mystery Illness and How to Finally Heal (Hay House; November 10, 2015).

by Anthony William

The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has created a secret epidemic. Out of the roughly 320 million people in the U.S., over 225 million Americans have some form of EBV.

Epstein-Barr is responsible for mystery illnesses of every category: For some people, it creates fatigue and pain that go unnamed. For others, EBV symptoms prompt doctors to prescribe ineffective treatments, such as hormone replacement. And for so many people walking around with EBV, it gets misdiagnosed.

Among the reasons EBV is thriving: so little is understood about it. Medical communities are aware of only one version of EBV, but there are actually over 60 varieties. Epstein-Barr is behind several of the debilitating illnesses that stump doctors. As I said in the Introduction, it’s the mystery illness of mystery illnesses.

Doctors have no idea how the virus operates long-term and how problematic it can be. The truth is, EBV is the source of numerous health problems that are currently considered mystery illnesses, such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. EBV is also the cause of some major maladies that medical communities think they understand but really don’t—including thyroid disease, vertigo, and tinnitus.

This chapter explains when the Epstein-Barr virus arose, how it’s transmitted, how it operates to create untold havoc in strategic stages no one knows about, and the steps (never revealed before) that can destroy the virus and restore health.

Though Epstein-Barr was discovered by two brilliant physicians in 1964, it had actually begun taking hold in the early 1900s—over half a century before. EBV’s initial versions—which are still with us—are relatively slow to act, and might not even create notable symptoms until late in life. Even then, they’re only mildly harmful. Many people have these non-aggressive EBV strains.

Unfortunately, EBV has evolved over the decades, and each generation of the virus has grown more challenging than the one before.

Until the publication of this book, those with EBV would typically be stuck with it for the rest of their lives. Doctors seldom recognize EBV as the root cause of the myriad of problems it creates; plus doctors have no idea how to address the Epstein-Barr virus even when it is recognized.

There are many ways to catch EBV. For example, you can get it as a baby if your mother has the virus. You can also get it through infected blood. Hospitals don’t screen for the virus, so any blood transfusion puts you at risk. You can even get it from eating out! That’s because chefs are under tremendous pressure to get dishes prepared quickly. They often end up cutting a finger or hand, slapping on a Band-Aid, and continuing to work. Their blood can get into the food…and if they happen to have EBV during a contagious phase, that can be enough to infect you.

Transmission can also happen through other bodily fluids, such as those exchanged during sex. Under some circumstances, even a kiss can be enough to transmit EBV.

Someone with the virus isn’t contagious all the time, though. It’s most likely to spread during its Stage Two. Which brings up something else that until now hasn’t been revealed: EBV goes through four stages.

If you catch EBV, it goes through an initial dormant period of floating around in your bloodstream doing little more than slowly replicating itself to build its numbers—and waiting for an opportunity to launch a more direct infection.

For example, if you physically exhaust yourself for weeks and give yourself no chance to fully recover, or allow your body to become deprived of essential nutrients such as zinc or vitamin B12, or undergo a traumatic emotional experience such as a breakup or the death of a loved one, the virus will detect your stress-related hormones and choose that time to take advantage.

EBV will also often act when you’re undergoing a major hormonal change—for example, during puberty, pregnancy, or menopause. A common scenario is when a woman goes through childbirth. Afterward, she may feel various symptoms, including fatigue, aches and pains, and depression. In this case EBV isn’t exploiting your weakness, but the fact that hormones are a powerful food source for it—their abundance acts as a trigger. The hormones flooding through your body effectively does for the virus what spinach does for Popeye.

EBV is inhumanly patient. This Stage One period of fortifying itself and waiting for an ideal opportunity can take weeks, months, or even a decade or longer, depending on a variety of factors.

The virus is especially vulnerable during Stage One. However, it’s also undetectable through tests and causes no symptoms, so you normally wouldn’t know to fight it, because you wouldn’t be aware it was there.

At the end of Stage One, the Epstein-Barr virus is ready to do battle with your body. That’s when EBV first makes its presence known…by turning into mononucleosis. This is the infamous mono that we all grow up hearing about as the “kissing disease.” It’s what thousands of college students contract every year when they run themselves down with all-night partying and studying.

Medical communities are unaware that every case of mononucleosis is only Stage Two of EBV.

This is the period when the virus is most contagious. It’s therefore advisable to avoid getting exposed to blood, saliva, or other bodily fluids from someone who has mono…or to avoid exposing anyone to your fluids if you have mono.

During this Stage Two, your body’s immune system goes to war with the virus. It sends identifier cells to “tag” virus cells, i.e., place a hormone on them that marks them as invaders. It then sends soldier cells to seek out and kill the tagged virus cells. This is the power of your immune system coming to your defense.

How severely this battle rages will vary from person to person, because everyone is different, and it will also depend on what EBV strain or variety a person has. You can have mono for just a week or two with a mild scratchy throat and tiredness, in which case you aren’t likely to realize what’s really happening, so you most likely won’t visit a doctor for a blood test.

Then again, you can get hit hard with fatigue, sore throat, fever, headaches, rashes, and more that hang on for several months. If this happens, the chances are you’ll go see a doctor who’ll test your blood, and the Epstein-Barr virus will show up as a form of mono…most of the time.

It’s during this stage that EBV seeks a long-term home by making a run for one or more of your major organs—typically your liver and/or spleen. EBV loves being in these organs because mercury, dioxins, and other toxins are likely to accumulate there. The virus thrives on these poisons.

One other secret about EBV is that it has a best friend, a bacterium called Streptococcus. In such cases your body is dealing with not only a virus, but also bacteria that further confuse the immune system and produce their own array of symptoms. This is Epstein-Barr’s number one cofactor.

During EBV’s Stage Two, Streptococcus can travel up to create strep throat and/or infest the sinuses, nose, or mouth. It can also travel down to create infections in the urinary tract, vagina, kidneys, or bladder . . . eventually causing cystitis.

Once the virus settles into your liver, spleen, and/or other organs, it nests there.

From this point on, when a doctor tests for Epstein-Barr, she or he will find antibodies and take these to indicate a past infection, when EBV was in its mono phase. The doctor will not find the EBV presently active in the bloodstream. The confusion here is one of the biggest blunders in medical history—this is how this virus has slipped through the cracks. Unless you have already followed the measures outlined in this book to kill the EBV, the virus is, in fact, still alive and causing new symptoms…and it’s eluding the tests. That’s because it’s living in the liver, spleen, or other organs, and the test to detect this has not yet been invented.

With the virus hiding undetected in your organs, your body assumes it’s won the war and the invader has been destroyed. Your immune system returns to its normal state, your mononucleosis ends, and your doctor tells you that you’re healthy.

Unfortunately, the Epstein-Barr virus has barely begun its voyage through your body.

If you have a typical variety, EBV could lie dormant in your organs for years—possibly for decades—without your knowing it. If you have an especially aggressive variety, though, EBV may create serious problems even while it’s nesting.

For example, the virus may burrow deep into your liver and spleen, causing those organs to become inflamed and enlarged. And once again, keep in mind that your doctor does not know to connect the dots between past EBV and its present activity in the organs.

The virus also creates three types of poison:

EBV excretes toxic waste matter, or viral byproduct. This becomes increasingly significant as the virus grows more cells, and its expanding army keeps eating and excreting poisonous byproduct. This waste matter is often identified as spirochetes, which can trigger false positives on tests such as Lyme titers (screening tests for Lyme disease) and lead to a false diagnosis of Lyme.
When a cell of the virus dies—which happens often, as the cells have a six-week life cycle—the corpse that is left behind is itself toxic and so further poisons your body. As with viral byproduct, this problem becomes more severe as EBV’s army grows, creating fatigue.
The poisons EBV creates through these two processes have the ability to generate a neurotoxin—i.e., a poison that disrupts nerve function and confuses your immune system. It will secrete this special toxin at strategic periods during Stage Three, and continuously during Stage Four, to prevent your immune system from zeroing in on the virus and attacking it.

The issues that may result from an aggressive variety of EBV nesting in your organs include:

Your liver performing so sluggishly that it does a poor job of flushing toxins out of your system.
Hepatitis C. (EBV is actually the primary cause of hepatitis C.)
Your liver’s sluggish performance leading to the lowering of your stomach’s hydrochloric acid and your intestinal tract starting to become toxic. This in turn can result in some food not being fully digested and instead putrefying in your intestinal tract, resulting in bloating and/or constipation.
Your developing sensitivities to foods that never caused you problems before. This happens when the virus consumes a food it likes, such as cheese, and transforms it into something your body doesn’t recognize.
The virus bides its time until it senses stress-related hormones indicating you’re in an especially vulnerable state—say, as a result of burning the candle at both ends, enduring a severe emotional blow, or suffering a physical jolt such as being in a car accident—or when it senses you’re undergoing hormonal upheaval, such as during pregnancy or menopause.

When the virus is nearly ready to spring, it begins excreting its neurotoxin. This adds to the burden on your system already created by EBV’s byproduct and virus corpses. All this poison in your system finally triggers your immune system—and also thoroughly confuses it, because it has no idea where the toxins are coming from.

The immune system response I’ve just described triggers the mysterious symptoms that doctors can diagnose as lupus. Medical communities have no understanding that lupus is just the body reacting to Epstein-Barr’s byproducts and neurotoxins. It’s the body having an allergic reaction to these neurotoxins, which then elevates the inflammatory markers that doctors search for to identify and diagnose lupus. In truth, lupus is just a viral infection of Epstein-Barr.
Hypothyroidism and Other Thyroid Disorders

While your immune system is in disarray, EBV takes advantage of the chaos by leaving the organs it’s been nesting in and making a run for a different major organ or gland—which this time is your thyroid!

Medical communities aren’t yet aware that EBV is the actual cause of most thyroid disorders and diseases—especially Hashimoto’s, but also Graves’, thyroid cancer, and other thyroid ills. (Thyroid disease is also sometimes caused by radiation; but in over 95 percent of cases, the culprit is Epstein-Barr.) Medical research has not yet uncovered the true causes of thyroid disorders, and it’s still decades away from discovering that EBV is the virus that causes them. If a doctor gives you a Hashimoto’s diagnosis, it really means that she or he doesn’t know what’s wrong. The claim is that your body is attacking your thyroid—a view that arises from misinformation. In truth, it’s the EBV—not your body—attacking the thyroid.

Once in your thyroid, EBV begins drilling into its tissues. The virus cells literally twist and spin like drills to burrow deep into the thyroid, killing thyroid cells and scarring the organ as they go, creating hidden hypothyroidism in millions of women, from mild cases to the more extreme. Your immune system notices this and tries to intervene, causing inflammation; but between EBV’s neurotoxin, viral byproduct, and poisonous corpses confusing things, and with EBV hiding in your thyroid, your immune system can’t tag the virus for complete destruction.

While the above may sound unnerving, don’t let it rattle you; your thyroid has the ability to rejuvenate and heal itself when it’s given what it needs. And never underestimate the power of your immune system, which by the end of this chapter will become activated just by you learning the truth.

As a fallback option, your immune system tries to wall off the virus with calcium, creating nodules in your thyroid. However, this doesn’t hurt EBV. First, most of its cells evade this attack and remain free. Second, a virus cell that your immune system successfully walls off typically remains alive and turns its calcium prison into a comfortable home, where it feeds on your thyroid, draining it of energy. The virus cell might even eventually transform its prison into a living growth, called a cyst, that creates further strain on your thyroid.

Meanwhile, these attacks against EBV can hurt you if you aren’t eating enough calcium-rich foods. That’s because if your immune system can’t get the calcium to wall off the virus from your bloodstream, it’ll extract what it needs from your bones…which can lead to osteoporosis.

Simultaneously, the hundreds of virus cells that aren’t imprisoned in nodules can weaken your thyroid, making it less effective at producing the hormones your body needs to function. This lack of adequate thyroid hormones, coupled with EBV’s toxins, can in turn lead to weight gain, fatigue, mental fogginess, impaired memory, depression, hair loss, insomnia, brittle nails, muscle weakness, and/or dozens of other symptoms.

Some especially rare, aggressive varieties of EBV go even further. They create cancer in the thyroid. The rate of thyroid cancer in the U.S. has been rising rapidly. Medical communities don’t know that the cause is an increase in rare, aggressive forms of EBV.

The Epstein-Barr virus invades your thyroid for a strategic reason—it’s seeking to confuse and place stress on your endocrine system. The strain on your adrenal glands produces more adrenaline, which is a favored food of EBV that makes it stronger and better able to go after its ultimate target: your nervous system.

The ultimate goal of the Epstein-Barr virus is to leave your thyroid and inflame your central nervous system.

Your immune system normally wouldn’t allow this to happen. But if EBV has successfully worn you down in Stage Three by entering your thyroid, and if on top of that you abruptly get clobbered with some physical or severe emotional injury, the virus will take advantage of your vulnerability and start to cause a multitude of strange symptoms that range from heart palpitations to generalized aches and pains to nerve pain.

A common scenario is being in an accident, getting surgery, or suffering some other physical damage, and then feeling awful for much longer than would be expected from the injury alone. A typical reaction is to “feel like a truck hit me.”

Blood tests, X-rays, and MRIs will reveal nothing wrong, so doctors won’t be aware of the virus inflaming the nerves. Stage Four Epstein-Barr is therefore a major source of mystery illnesses—that is, problems that cause doctors massive confusion.

What’s actually happening is that your injured nerves trigger an “alarm” hormone to notify your body that the nerves are exposed and need repair. In Stage Four, EBV detects that hormone and rushes over to latch onto those damaged nerves.

A nerve is similar to a string of yarn with little root hairs hanging off it. When the nerve is injured, the root hairs pop off the sides of the nerve sheath. EBV looks for those openings and grabs onto them. If it succeeds, it can keep the area inflamed for years. As a result, you can have a relatively small injury that remains flared up and causes you continual pain.

The issues that result from this viral inflammation can include muscle pain, joint pain, painful tender points, back pain, tingling and/or numbness in the hands and feet, migraines, ongoing fatigue, dizziness, insomnia, unrestful sleep, and night sweats. Patients with these issues are sometimes diagnosed as having fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, or rheumatoid arthritis, all of which are collections of symptoms that medical communities admit they don’t understand and for which they have no cure. In such cases the patients are given inappropriate treatments that don’t begin to address the real culprit—because these mystery illnesses are really Stage Four Epstein-Barr.

One of the greatest missteps of all time is mistaking women’s Epstein-Barr symptoms for perimenopause and menopause. Symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, heart palpitations, dizziness, depression, hair loss, and anxiety were and are frequently misinterpreted as hormonal change—which is what launched the disastrous HRT movement. (To learn more, see Chapter 15, “Premenstrual Syndrome and Menopause.”)

Let’s take a closer look at the chronic illnesses that have puzzled doctors for decades and are the result of Stage Four Epstein-Barr.
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

There’s a long history of womankind facing denial that there’s a physical cause of their suffering. Like those with fibromyalgia (see below), people with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)—also known by names such as myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS), and systemic exertion intolerance disease (SEID)—often hear that they are liars, lazy, delusional, and/or crazy. It’s an illness that affects women in disproportionately large numbers.

And chronic fatigue syndrome is on the rise.

It’s becoming common for young women in college to return home mid-semester with the condition, unable to do anything but lie in bed. Contracting CFS as a woman in your late teens or early 20s can be particularly devastating as you watch friends move on with relationships and jobs, meanwhile feeling stuck and unable to live up to your potential.

Women who get CFS in their 30s, 40s, or 50s have their own obstacles: while you’re old enough at this point to have an established life and support network, you also have established responsibilities. You’re likely trying to be everything to everybody, taking care of more than you can handle, and so you feel the pressure to act normal when CFS hits.

Compounding the isolation for both age groups are the feelings of guilt, fear, and shame that accompany their misdiagnoses. I’m sure that if you have CFS, you’ve been in the depths of physical suffering and had someone say, “But you look perfectly healthy.” It is so disheartening to feel unwell and hear from practitioners, friends, or family that there’s nothing wrong with you.

Chronic fatigue syndrome is real. It’s the Epstein-Barr virus.

As we’ve seen, those with CFS have an elevated viral load of EBV, which systematically afflicts the body by creating a neurotoxin that inflames the central nervous system. This can eventually weaken the adrenals and digestive system, and create the feeling that you have a low battery.

We’ve had over six decades of medical denial that fibromyalgia is a legitimate problem. Now, medical communities are finally accepting it as an actual condition.

The best explanation doctors are given by the establishment, though, is that fibromyalgia is overactive nerves. What this really translates to is…no one has a clue. It’s not the doctors’ fault. There’s no magic book they receive that tells them what will help their fibromyalgia patients or what is genuinely causing their pain.

The medical system is still years from discovering the illness’s true root—because it’s viral, and it takes place at a nerve level that medical tools currently can’t detect.

Those suffering from fibromyalgia are under a very real and debilitating attack. It’s the Epstein-Barr virus that is causing this disorder, inflaming both the central nervous system and nerves throughout the body, which creates ongoing pain, sensitivity to touch, severe fatigue, and a host of other issues.

Tinnitus, or ringing in the ear, is usually caused by EBV getting into the inner ear’s nerve channel, called the labyrinth. The ringing is the result of the virus inflaming and vibrating the labyrinth and the vestibulocochlear nerve.
Vertigo and Meniere’s Disease

Vertigo and Meniere’s disease are often attributed by doctors to calcium crystals, or stones, becoming disrupted in the inner ear. However, most chronic cases are actually caused by EBV’s neurotoxin inflaming the vagus nerve.
Other Symptoms

Anxiety, dizziness, chest tightness, chest pain, esophageal spasms, and asthma can also be caused by EBV inflaming the vagus nerve.

Insomnia, and tingling and numbness in hands and feet, can be caused by phrenic nerves becoming perpetually inflamed by EBV.

And heart palpitations can result from buildup of EBV’s poisonous virus corpses and byproduct in the heart’s mitral valve.

If you have EBV, or suspect you do, you may find the virus in Stage Four beyond frustrating. Take comfort. If you take the right steps—which medical communities don’t know about yet, but which are covered at the end of this chapter—you can recover, rebuild your immune system, return to a normal state again, and regain control of your life.

As I’ve noted earlier, there are over 60 varieties of the Epstein-Barr virus. That number is so large because EBV has existed for well over 100 years. It’s had generations of people to move through, mutating and elevating its various hybrids and strains in that time. The strains can be organized into six groups of escalating severity, with roughly ten types per group.

EBV Group 1 is the oldest and mildest. These versions of the virus typically take years, even decades, to transition from one stage to another. Their effects might not be noticeable until you’re in your 70s or 80s, and then result in little more than back pain. They might even remain in your organs and never reach Stage Three or Stage Four.

EBV Group 2 moves from stage to stage a bit quicker than Group 1; you might notice symptoms in your 50s or 60s. These varieties may partially linger in the thyroid and send only some of their virus cells out to inflame nerves, resulting in relatively mild nerve inflammation. The only variety of EBV that medical communities are aware of is in this group.

EBV Group 3 will transition between stages faster than Group 2, so its symptoms might be noticeable around age 40. Also, these viruses fully complete Stage Four—that is, they entirely leave the thyroid to latch onto nerves. Viruses in this group can cause a variety of ills, including joint pain, fatigue, heart palpitations, tinnitus, and vertigo.

EBV Group 4 will create noticeable problems as early as age 30. Its aggressive actions on nerves can result in symptoms associated with fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, brain fog, confusion, anxiety, moodiness, and everything caused by Groups 1 to 3. This group can also create symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder, even if a person never underwent any trauma beyond getting inflamed by the virus.

EBV Group 5 will create noticeable issues as early as age 20. This is an especially nasty form of the virus because it strikes just when a young person is setting out to start an independent life. It can create all the problems of Group 4, and it feeds off negative emotions such as fear and worry. Doctors who can’t find anything wrong, and perceive these patients as young and healthy, often declare “it’s all in your head” and send them to psychologists to convince them what’s actually happening in their bodies isn’t real. Unless, that is, a patient happens upon a doctor who’s up on the Lyme disease trend, in which case the patient will probably walk away with a Lyme misdiagnosis.

The worst type, however, is EBV Group 6, which can strike hard even in young children. In addition to everything Group 5 does, Group 6 can create symptoms so severe that they’re misdiagnosed as leukemia, viral meningitis, lupus, and more. Plus it suppresses the immune system, which can lead to a wide variety of symptoms including rashes, weakness in the limbs, and severe nerve pain.

Because it’s very easy to catch and hard to detect, and can cause a number of mysterious symptoms, you might understandably find the Epstein-Barr virus overwhelming and its effects disheartening.

The good news is that if you carefully and patiently follow the steps detailed in this section, and in Part IV of the book, you can heal. You can recover your immune system, free yourself of EBV, rejuvenate your body, gain full control over your health, and move on with your life.

How long the process takes varies for each individual and depends on myriad factors. Some people conquer the virus in as little as three months. However, a more typical period is a full year. And there are some people who need 18 months or more to destroy EBV.
Healing Foods

Certain fruits and vegetables can help your body rid itself of EBV and heal from its effects. The following are the best ones to incorporate into your diet (listed in rough order of importance). Try to eat at least three of these foods per day—the more the better—rotating your consumption so that in a given week or two, you get all of these foods into your system.

Wild blueberries: help restore the central nervous system and flush EBV neurotoxins out of the liver.
Celery: strengthens hydrochloric acid in the gut and provides mineral salts to the central nervous system.
Sprouts: high in zinc and selenium to strengthen the immune system against EBV.
Asparagus: cleanses the liver and spleen; strengthens the pancreas.
Spinach: creates an alkaline environment in the body and provides highly absorbable micronutrients to the nervous system.
Cilantro: removes heavy metals such as mercury and lead, which are favored foods of EBV.
Parsley: removes high levels of copper and aluminum, which feed EBV.
Coconut oil: antiviral and acts as an anti-inflammatory.
Garlic: antiviral and antibacterial that defends against EBV.
Ginger: helps with nutrient assimilation and relieves spasms associated with EBV.
Raspberries: rich in antioxidants to remove free radicals from the organs and bloodstream.
Lettuce: stimulates peristaltic action in the intestinal tract and helps cleanse EBV from the liver.
Papayas: restore the central nervous system; strengthen and rebuild hydrochloric acid in the gut.
Apricots: immune system rebuilders that also strengthen the blood.
Pomegranates: help detox and cleanse the blood as well as the lymphatic system.
Grapefruit: rich source of bioflavonoids and calcium to support the immune system and flush toxins out of the body.
Kale: high in specific alkaloids that protect against viruses such as EBV.
Sweet potatoes: help cleanse and detox the liver from EBV byproducts and toxins.
Cucumbers: strengthen the adrenals and kidneys and flush neurotoxins out of the bloodstream.
Fennel: contains strong antiviral compounds to fight off EBV.

Healing Herbs and Supplements

The following herbs and supplements (listed in rough order of importance) can further strengthen your immune system and aid your body in healing from the virus’s effects:

Cat’s claw: herb that reduces EBV and cofactors such as strep A and strep B.
Silver hydrosol: lowers EBV viral load.
Zinc: strengthens the immune system and protects the thyroid from EBV inflammation.
Vitamin B12 (as methylcobalamin and/or adenosylcobalamin): strengthens the central nervous system.
Licorice root: lowers EBV production and strengthens the adrenals and kidneys.
Lemon balm: antiviral and antibacterial. Kills EBV cells and strengthens the immune system.
5-MTHF (5-methyltetrahydrofolate): helps strengthen the endocrine system and central nervous system.
Selenium: strengthens and protects the central nervous system.
Red marine algae: powerful antiviral that removes heavy metals such as mercury and reduces viral load.
L-lysine: lowers EBV load and acts as a central nervous system anti-inflammatory.
Spirulina (preferably from Hawaii): rebuilds the central nervous system and eliminates heavy metals.
Ester-C: strengthens the immune system and flushes EBV toxins from the liver.
Nettle leaf: provides vital micronutrients to the brain, blood, and central nervous system.
Monolaurin: antiviral; breaks down EBV load and reduces cofactors.
Elderberry: antiviral; strengthens the immune system.
Red clover: cleanses the liver, lymphatic system, and spleen of neurotoxins from EBV.
Star anise: antiviral; helps destroy EBV in the liver and thyroid.
Curcumin: component of turmeric that helps strengthen the endocrine system and central nervous system.

A Career Almost Lost to Epstein-Barr

Michelle and her husband, Matthew, both had high-paying corporate jobs. Michelle was a star at her firm and made a point of going to work throughout her pregnancy, leaving only when she was about to go into labor.

After giving birth, Michelle instantly fell in love with her new son, Jordan. She couldn’t have been happier. I have it all now, she thought, a career I love, and a family I love even more.

But Michelle’s bright future started to dim when she was struck with a fatigue she couldn’t shake. No matter how many vitamins she took or how much she exercised, she felt run-down all the time. So Michelle visited her doctor. After giving her a physical, he dismissed her concerns: “You look fine to me. It’s natural for a new baby to be exhausting. Just get more sleep and don’t worry about it.”

Michelle took care to sleep more. After another week, she felt worse than ever. Suspecting a post-pregnancy issue, Michelle went to see her OB/GYN. This doctor drew her blood for a number of tests, including several for thyroid disease. When the lab results came in, the OB/GYN correctly diagnosed Michelle as having Hashimoto’s—i.e., her thyroid was no longer producing the level of hormones needed.

Michelle was put on thyroid medication to get her hormone levels back to normal. This made her feel a little better…though not quite as well as she had before her pregnancy. She’d been aiming to return to work a month after having her son, and now she had to postpone those plans.

After about six months, Michelle’s fatigue was back—and much more severe. That’s when Michelle’s troubles really began. Soon she had trouble taking care of Jordan. Matthew agreed to help out until she felt better.

Instead, Michelle grew worse. On top of being tired, she started to feel aches and pains, especially in her joints. Michelle returned to her OB/GYN, who ran another set of tests. The lab results showed nothing wrong. Thanks to the thyroid medication Michelle was continuing to take, her thyroid levels were perfect. So were all her vitamin and mineral levels. The OB/GYN was baffled.

Suspecting that Michelle’s symptoms were related to her thyroid condition, the OB/GYN referred Michelle to a top endocrinologist (a doctor who specializes in hormonal issues). The specialist conducted a thorough thyroid profile, and tested Michelle’s other hormone levels from a variety of angles. He ended up telling Michelle she had “mild adrenal fatigue.”

There was some small truth to that. Michelle’s adrenal glands were being strained by the Epstein-Barr virus, which her pregnancy had triggered and which was now inflaming her thyroid.

The endocrinologist told Michelle to take it easy and avoid stress. On his recommendation, Michelle handed off the freelance consulting projects she’d been working on from home.

In reality, Michelle’s job had nothing to do with her condition. Her source of stress wasn’t her work, but the illness that was eating away at her life…and her seeming helplessness to understand it or do anything about it.

Michelle continued to get worse. Her knees flared up and swelled, making it difficult to walk. She bought knee supports…and decided to pursue help more aggressively. Michelle’s intuition told her an invader was present in her body, so she went to see an infectious disease specialist. This would be precisely the right thing to do—if infectious disease doctors actually knew how to recognize and treat past infections of EBV.

Unfortunately, they don’t. So after running an exhausting battery of tests and noticing that Michelle had an antibody from a past EBV infection, he dismissed it as a problem right away. This doctor told her she was physically fit. He added that she might be depressed, and offered to refer her to a psychiatrist.

Infuriated at being made to feel she was crazy for trying to address what she deeply sensed was a real physical problem, Michelle (painfully) rose and strode out of the room.

With increasing desperation, Michelle now visited doctors across the spectrum. They put her through ultrasounds, X-rays, MRIs, CT scans, and loads of blood tests. She was told she had Candida, fibromyalgia, MS, lupus, Lyme disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. None of it was right. She was put on immunosuppressant drugs, antibiotics, and loads of different supplements. None of the treatments helped.

Michelle became an insomniac, suffered heart palpitations, and developed chronic vertigo that caused dizziness and nausea. She dropped from 140 to 115 pounds.

Soon, Michelle was spending most of her days in bed. She was wasting away. Her husband, Matthew, was terrified.

After Michelle had spent four years exploring all other options, and based on the recommendation of the naturopath Michelle visited, Matthew called my office as a last resort. When my assistant answered, Matthew burst into tears. “What’s wrong?” she asked.

He replied, “My wife is dying.”

For our first appointment Matthew planned to do most of the talking while sitting next to Michelle, who was in bed. Less than a minute after Matthew started telling me Michelle’s story, I interrupted him. “It’s okay,” I said. “Spirit tells me it’s an aggressive form of the Epstein-Barr virus.”

The virus’s neurotoxin was inflaming all of Michelle’s joints. Her insomnia and foot pain were the result of her phrenic nerves being perpetually inflamed. Her vertigo stemmed from EBV’s neurotoxin inflaming her vagus nerve. And her heart palpitations were being caused by buildup of EBV virus corpses and viral byproduct in her mitral valve.

“Don’t worry,” I told Michelle and Matthew. “I know how to beat this virus.”

Michelle exclaimed, with as much joyful energy as she could muster, “I knew it was a virus!”

It was the first critical step in her recovery.

I recommended a blend of celery juice and papaya, which is great for boosting someone in Michelle’s condition (e.g., low weight, not being able to eat, high number of virus cells). I followed that up with the recommendations for healing in this chapter, including a list of helpful supplements, as well as the recommendations from Part IV, “How to Finally Heal.”

The cleanse diet immediately stopped feeding Michelle’s EBV. Within a week, there was a noticeable reduction of the swelling in her knees. The L-lysine shut down Michelle’s vertigo. And the other supplements started killing virus cells and/or dampening the production of new ones.

In three months, Michelle was regularly up and walking again. In nine months, she was once again working part-time at her challenging corporate job.

And in 18 months, Michelle’s pain and suffering were just a memory—she’d taken control over EBV. Today, Michelle has fully recovered her health. She’s returned to juggling her job and her family energetically and happily.
An End to CFS Confinement

Cynthia was a mother of two. Shortly after her youngest, Sophie, was born, Cynthia began experiencing fatigue. It took everything she had to push through the day, and she relied on increasing her coffee intake just to function. Within a few years, she had to quit her part-time job at a clothing store because long naps were taking up her afternoons. She needed the rest so she could be strong enough to meet her kids at the school bus, make dinner, and help them with their homework.

Cynthia noticed herself becoming irritable, and arguments arose often with her husband, Mark, who didn’t understand why she was tired all the time. After all, the tests that Cynthia’s doctor had run indicated nothing was wrong. The doctor said she was healthy and concluded that maybe she was just unhappy or depressed.

This made Cynthia want to walk out of the doctor’s office without another word. Any blue mood she experienced was because she was tired all the time and could barely function—not the other way around. Yet her husband sided with the doctor and became increasingly resentful toward her.

The ongoing stress put Cynthia on overload; life felt impossible to keep up with. She couldn’t find the energy to brush her hair, and the mere thought of running the vacuum cleaner or washing the dishes exhausted her. From the outside, it looked like she was giving up on life. Mark got angrier—he was talking separation now. “I work too long and hard at the office all day to worry about taking care of things at home,” he said. “This is supposed to be your department.”

Cynthia felt more pressure than ever to get better, but the worries about her marriage and what would happen to her children put her fatigue at an all-time high. She could barely drive to the grocery store or make dinner for her family. All she could do was lie in bed or on the couch.

This is what a moderate-to-severe case of undiagnosed chronic fatigue syndrome can look like. When Cynthia called me, her life had fallen apart. Her husband had left her, and her daughter, Sophie, now seven years old, and her son, Ryan, age nine, had lost their family unit. What her doctor had misconstrued as a psychiatric condition was an actual physical problem: Epstein-Barr virus. The same story applies to far too many women.

I set to work informing Cynthia that she had a case of EBV that her doctor had missed. With an emphasis on getting her viral load under control and addressing nutritional deficiencies, I laid out the background on CFS that I described earlier in this chapter, and I explained the protocols outlined here and in Part IV. Like her life depended on it—because it did—Cynthia followed Spirit’s advice.

Slowly, Cynthia began to get better. Her adrenals recovered normal function, and her stamina returned. Once again, she could tend to her children, run errands, keep the house in shape, and do her hair—all without the gallons of coffee she used to rely on. Cynthia finally had the energy to return to work, too.

After witnessing this change in his wife, Mark called Cynthia and asked her out to dinner—his mother would look after the kids, he said. When they arrived at the fancy restaurant, which had long ago been the deli where they had flirted as college students, Mark told Cynthia he’d called ahead and ordered a special healing-food meal for her—and that he’d ordered the same for himself, out of solidarity. Over sundried-tomato hummus and vegetable nori rolls, Mark didn’t exactly cry (some things would always stay the same), but he did have to dab at his eyes as he apologized for how he’d behaved.

Cynthia was quiet, then answered with a playful smile: “You can make it up to me.”

After a few weeks of testing the waters—Cynthia wanted to make sure Mark didn’t just want her back as a security blanket and housekeeper—they moved back in together as a family. Mark now wakes up early every Saturday morning so he can get to the farmers’ market before they run out of salad greens.
Fibro Pain Forgotten

Stacy, a 41-year-old part-time receptionist in a doctors’ office, had been married to Rob, who worked at a car dealership, for over 15 years. She never had the energy to keep up with the outings Rob planned with their daughters. In fact, she couldn’t remember ever feeling that well. She always felt slightly achy and more tired than her friends seemed to be. And since she’d given birth to her second child, who was now 11, the fatigue and muscle soreness had been more pronounced.

One weekend while Rob and the kids were at a museum, she went for a longer walk than usual—she’d decided to push herself to lose some unwanted weight she’d gained in the last few years. Afterward, she noticed an unusual pain in her left knee. Thinking back to her college basketball coach’s advice to “walk it off,” she tried to ignore it.

It didn’t go away. Two weeks later, she scheduled time for an exam with a doctor at her office. Stacy limped out of the appointment with a prescription for an MRI—which revealed nothing visibly wrong with her knee.

Because Stacy’s balance was off from leaning on her “good” leg, she found herself tripping easily—stairs, curbs, and corners of rugs had become major obstacles. Then her right knee started to hurt even though it hadn’t gotten injured in any of her falls, and exams showed nothing amiss. Stacy’s worry escalated to fear—something was really wrong. The doctors in her office ruled out rheumatoid arthritis, though, and guessed that the extra 30 pounds Stacy was carrying were to blame for her pain.

Soon Stacy started to hurt in other places. Now she couldn’t raise her hands over her head without her arms and neck hurting. She was unable to work anymore, and depression set in as she started to spend hours at home on the sofa. At night, Rob would make dinner for the family and send their daughter to serve Stacy her plate of food on the couch.

A specialist concluded that Stacy had fibromyalgia. When Stacy asked what caused it, the doctor responded, “We don’t know. It’s what we think is oversensitive nerves. This should help, though.” She handed Stacy a prescription for a medicine popular for treating depression and fibromyalgia pain. At her next visit to the specialist, when Stacy reported no progress, the doctor referred her to me.

After I explained what her fibromyalgia really was, that the real cause was the Epstein-Barr virus and that it had been in her system since childhood, Stacy recalled having a bout of mononucleosis at age 14. She finally felt she had a real answer. She understood now that poor diet, nutritional deficiencies, and increased stress had triggered the formerly dormant EBV to surface as fibromyalgia. Not knowing what was wrong with her—the powerlessness—had been scarier than knowing the true cause; the mystery of her mystery illness had been the hardest part. Now she had direction and felt confident in her ability to heal.

Within six months of our first call, following the same suggestions I describe in this chapter and Part IV, “How to Finally Heal,” she was free from fibromyalgia, back to work, and living life again. She told me she felt happier and healthier than ever, and that she’d planned the next family outing—apple picking at an organic orchard.

Did you like this? Share it:

A year of Treatments Trials for Fibromyalgia.

+100%-A recent analysis of the chronic fatigue syndrome treatment citations produced over the past three years indicated that behavioral studies, in particular, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) studies, dominated the ME/CFS treatment field.  Behavioral studies tended to be large, well-replicated and most emanated from two countries – the UK and the Netherlands.  Non-behavioral ME/CFS studies, on the hand, tended to be smaller, were rarely replicated, and many emanated from countries with smaller research establishments.

treatment trials fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is similar to ME/CFS in that it receives poor funding, is controversial in some circles and often overlaps with ME/CFS. Fibromyalgia is different in that it has a home in specialty (rheumatology); its main symptom – pain – is a hot item right now, the FDA has approved three drugs for it and drug companies are interested.

In an attempt to understand what types of treatments researchers are focusing on right now in FM, I surveyed all FM treatment citations ( e.g. studies, reviews) found in PubMed over the past year.  As with the chronic fatigue syndrome survey, I categorized them according to whether they referred to behavioral/non-behavioral studies and noted the country of origin.

A three-year survey of PubMed yielded 78 treatment citations for ME/CFS. A one year FM survey on PubMed yielded 68 citations.

Non-Behavioral Studies Dominate

In contrast to chronic fatigue syndrome biological studies dominated FM treatment publications

Only one-third of FM citations over the past year referred behavioral citations while two-thirds referred to non-behavioral, e.g. biological studies.  This finding contrasted strongly with that found in the ME/CFS survey which indicated that 70% of treatment citations referred to behavioral treatments.

Behavioral Studies

Exercise studies dominated the behavioral approach to FM with two-thirds of the behavioral citations last year referring to them.  Few CBT studies were done.  In contrast to the two countries (UK, Netherlands) that dominated the behavioral treatment portfolio in ME/CFS, no countries dominated the behavioral treatment portfolio.

Non-behavioral Studies

Balanced Portofolio

FM’s non-behavioral treatment portfolio showed balance with drug citations easily the most prevalent but with other treatment aspects showing balance – showing that interest in FM comes from all quarters.

  • Drugs – 22
  • Brain and other Stimulation – 7
  • Musculoskeletal Manipulation – 7
  • Supplements and Nutrition – 7
  • Others – 3

Drug Interest High But Innovation Lacking



New-postsLike the blog? Make sure you don’t miss the latest on ME/CFS and FM treatment and research news by registering for our free  ME/CFS and Fibromyalgia blog here.

The 22 citations referring to drugs suggested significant interest in drugs for FM is present. However, no new drugs were assessed; all the citations referred to already approved or otherwise well-known drugs. The continuing emphasis on FDA approved drugs suggests that getting FDA approval is a sure way to continued research.

With fibromyalgia’s home Institute, NIAMS, focusing almost exclusively on behavioral aspects FM’s next breakthrough in drug development is probably not going to come out research done at the NIH. Given the NIH’s prominence in research that’s a real concern.

Stimulating Therapies Provide Hope

With seven studies done on two types of brain stimulation and two other stimulation types, nervous system stimulation technologies  are clearly getting interest.  How this aspect of treatment will shake isn’t clear but the field is developing rapidly, and improvements in the technology should continue.

These technologies are mostly non-invasive but one group found that implanting electrodes in the cervical vertebrae of treatment-resistant FM patients was well tolerated and significantly improved quality of life.  Another intriguing possibility involves external or subcutaneous stimulation of the trigeminal nerve in the head. Besides FM trigeminal nerve stimulation is being tested in epilepsy and depression.

Vagus nerve stimulation has been assessed in FM (but not this year). Whether the very promising results from the one small study will be followed up on is unclear.  It and the other stimulatory techniques showing up suggest, however, that a rich field is emerging.

A Range of Musculoskeletal Trials

Musculoskeletal treatment trials incorporated a number of different methods. Neurodynamic mobilization and extracorporeal shockwave treatment, for instance,  use two different approaches to the musculoskeletal pain found in FM. Neurodynamic mobilization is a bodywork approach that seeks to relieve constrictions in the muscles.

Extracorporeal shockwave treatments use shockwaves to induce tissue repair and regeneration. It has been FDA approved for use in treatment-resistant plantar fasciitis.

Alternative Therapies and Nutrition

alternative therapies fibromyalgia

Adding a food product palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) to duloxetine significantly reduced pain levels over duloxetine alone in FM patients. This is the first PEA trial in FM but other studies suggest that PEA may be helpful with chronic pain. Be warned that it may take some time though.  A recent Italian pelvic pain study found PEA’s results didn’t show up at three months but did at six. PEA is getting quite a bit of research – most of which is coming out of Italy.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is another unorthodox but possibly helpful treatment that showed up in treatment studies last year.  It too is being tested in a variety of disorders.

Join Health Rising’s ME/CFS, FM and Chronic Pain Forums!

ForumsShare your pain, make friends, find new treatment options, check out recovery stories and more in the Health Rising ME/CFS, FM and Chronic Pain Forums here

Acetyl-l-carnitine was about as effective as duloxetine in reducing pain. Testosterone – a substance used by many alternative practitioners – showed up in two citations last year.


One can’t characterize the FM treatment field as booming (no new drug possibilities showed up in the literature last year) –  but it is fairly diverse and, in contrast to ME/CFS, shows balance.

The four FM drugs expected approved over the next couple of years are reformulations of past drugs. While each may improve increased relief none is expected to break new ground – a need in FM. (Two are reformulations of Lyrica, one is a sublingual form of Flexeril, and one is a new SNRI.) Pridgen’s antiviral regimen is an entirely new approach. The Phase II study didn’t make it into the study literature this year but will next year and a trial is expected in 2017.

The lack of research funding for FM at the NIH is a concern. Although the NIH devotes more dollars to FM than ME/CFS, ME/CFS researchers are engaged in more innovative studies.

Given the new emphasis on pain research in general, though, there is reason to hope that new types of treatments are on the way.



Country Breakdown

Behavioral = 23

Exercise – 16

CBT /GET – 3

  • Music listening
  • Symptom Control
  • Forgiveness
  • Mind/Body
  • Mindfulness Training

Behavioral = 23

  • Spain – 7
  • US – 6
  • Turkey – 4
  • Italy – 2
  • Brazil – 2
  • France – 1
  • Sweden – 1

Non-behavioral = 43

  • USA – 12
  • Spain – 5
  • Italy – 3
  • France – 3
  • Belgium, Turkey – 2
  • Denmark, Canada, Norway, Germany, Japan, Lebannon

Non-behavioral Categories

Drugs = 22

  • Milnacipran – 7
  • Duloxetine – 4
  • Pain Drug Effectiveness – 2
  • Lyrica – 2
  • Amitriptyline – 2
  • Neurontin, Tramadol – 1
  • Amytriptyline, Duloxetine, Gabapentin, Pregbalin – Health care utilization, SSRI – review, Pharmacotherapy Review

Brain and other Stimulation = 7

Muscoskeletal = 7

Supplements and Nutrition – 7

Alternative Therapies – 4


  • Join Our ME/CFS, FM and Chronic Pain Forums
  • Tell Your Story – Coming Soon!
  • Write For Us! Find out how here…

Support Health Rising





Did you like this? Share it: