Tag Archives: headache

What does IVIG treatment feel like?

IVIG therapy also known as a normal human immunoglobulin, the use of a mixture of antibodies to treat a number of health conditions. This treatment can treatment many diseases such as mine autonomic neuropathy, autonomic small cell neuropathy, autonomic dysfunction but is used for so many other treatments and everyone has their own idea of what the treatment is like I can only explain how it makes me feel. Everyone’s experience is different. I was told you may be cold, or fluish, fatigue and painful joints.

My particular treatment plan is 5 days on and 3 weeks off. I was ready to go, positive thinking, I am not going to have any site effects, I am thinking positive. So it can be done by injection or IV. Mine is IV. One particular thing we noticed The faster the IV the more sick I felt, so a 2-3 hour treatment turned into 5 hours. This is done in a infusion center. and all around you are cancer patients, infectious disease all receiving some sort of treatment. That alone makes the entire situation more surreal. Other than the poke in the vein, it was nothing, I had planned on writing reading, but a part me needed to watch, learn and listen to what was happening, not out of disrespect for other patients but one reality of what I was enduring and 2 how lucky I was I was alive, tears for the people that were so sick, its really a difficult place to say Yeah I get to go to treatment today. So I dressed up, I was raised if you felt bad, dress up and you’ll feel better. I was the only one not in pjs, sweats etc.. I wanted to ward off all evils. I didn’t know what to expect,

The headache began, wow! I had never had a headache like this, took Tylenol, no relief, my legs hurt but that was normal but usually heat helps, not this time. I was nauseated, well I was use to that but I could conquer this, these people are fighting for their life, I can do this, I found myself tired, warn out, barley wanting to make it to the car, but tomorrow was going to be better. I came home no appetite and just slept until the tornado began, it was building and I was doing guided imagery to stop it, wasn’t working, I am getting a warmer and warmer stomach, head felt hot, didn’t even want to watch TV. I had so many things planned that I would get done during treatment.

Day 2 a little worse, Day 3 little worse, still forcing myself t dress up, said screw bringing the computer or writing or reading, I knew now, my fight was just beginning. I kept thinking just 2 more days, then sleep for a month. little did I know the days following made me sicker and sicker, found myself sleeping on the bathroom floor, can’t eat, can’t drink, my taste buds were leaving before the treatment but now gone, I was so sick I spent Christmas in the hospital, I didn’t even care that it was Christmas, my veins were giving out, and find a vein that worked was getting difficult, but I was so use to it, it didn’t hurt, my arms trashed, my hands are trashed so I had to have a port put in. This allows the treatment to have access with out having to stick me 6 times. It put me over the edge. The Doctor said it was normal for people to have this reaction after the first 5 days. Thanks for the information. I start again on the 25th, my taste buds are gone, I’m nauseated to the point the meds don’t work anymore, I will crave something like fruit and I pay after. I always thought food was suppose to be good for you, now its just a necessity to stay alive, I can even hold that down, my chest hurts, my esophagus hurts and burns like its on fire. My smell has changed and sounds, its like effecting every aspect of my life and with out food I have no energy, I guess because my body is loosing wt slowly it doesn’t matter, but when you can’t get out of bed your not going to burn a lot of calories.

So for me I pray my second treatment I will handle better and get through this easier. I have home health to do it at the house because with out a immune system, I can’t be around infectious disease. I feel so blessed, I can be in my pjs and no one will think lesser of me because it will just be me and the nurse. So I know I have along road, but it’s a road worth fighting. sometimes I feel so sick Ipray I don’t wake up, and peoples responses still blow me away, Until you try it, you don’t know how you will feel during and after treatment. so I will pray each treatment gets better and I will start to feel better, my dream to get my life back. I am willing to do anything to live. But IVIG is no picnic. But if you are starting this treatment your reaction may be different, you may have no symptoms, I pray that for you and myself.

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Post concussion Syndrome

I am sure everyone has heard of Concussions, but Did you know there is a Post Concussion Syndrome?  I didn’t and I found out the hard way.  I wish I could say I was doing a great jump on skies and got a concussion, but in all honesty, I had a drop attack.  For those of you don’t know what a drop attack it is, Its when you fall for know reason or warning, I fell on ceramic tile floor in my kitchen.  Would think your own home is no safe!  I didn’t go to the hospital and tell them what happened, so I waited, I noticed 2 days later the skull pain was getting worse and I couldn’t remember anything and my vision changing and extreme nausea.  So I went to ER.   Well had a CT that showed a concussion and they thought whip lash.  Went home on meds for pain and I saw my family practice and said I needed to be quiet, no stimulation.  I started feeling better but the memory was getting worse and the skull pain was a 15 out of -1-10, so I went back and they repeated the Ct scan and said it was Post Concussion Syndrome can last as little as a couple weeks, months or as long as a year.  The memory loss is the scariest part to me but the skull pain feels like your head is in a vice being squeezed you think it's going to pop,  Also extreme tinnitus, but that is something I had been use to but it increased big time.  So just because It wasn't a ski jump, a dance fall or a car wreck, it can be serious and head trauma should be evaluated as soon as possible. 

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What is POTS !!!!!!!!

What is Postural Tachycardia Syndrome?

Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is one of a group of disorders that have orthostatic intolerance (OI) as their primary symptom. OI describes a condition in which an excessively reduced volume of blood returns to the heart after an individual stands up from a lying down position. The primary symptom of OI is lightheadedness or fainting. In POTS, the lightheadedness or fainting is also accompanied by a rapid increase in heartbeat of more than 30 beats per minute, or a heart rate that exceeds 120 beats per minute, within 10 minutes of rising. The faintness or lightheadedness of POTS are relieved by lying down again. Anyone at any age can develop POTS, but the majority of individuals affected (between 75 and 80 percent) are women between the ages of 15 to 50 years of age. Some women report an increase in episodes of POTS right before their menstrual periods. POTS often begins after a pregnancy, major surgery, trauma, or a viral illness. It may make individuals unable to exercise because the activity brings on fainting spells or dizziness.

Doctors aren’t sure yet what causes the reduced return of blood to the heart that occurs in OI, or why the heart begins to beat so rapidly in POTS.  Current thinking is that there are a number of mechanisms.  Some individuals have peripheral denervation (neuropathic POTS); some have symptoms that are due to sustained or parosyxmal overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system (hyperadrenergic POTS); and many individuals with POTS have significant deconditioning.

Is there any treatment?

Therapies for POTS are targeted at relieving low blood volume or regulating circulatory problems that could be causing the disorder. No single treatment has been found to be effect for all. A number of drugs seem to be effective in the short term.  Whether they help in long term is uncertain.  Simple interventions such as adding extra salt to the diet and attention to adequate fluid intake are often effective. The drugs fludrocortisone (for those on a high salt diet) and midodrine in low doses are often used to increase blood volume and narrow blood vessels. Drinking 16 ounces of water (2 glassfuls) before getting up can also help raise blood pressure. Some individuals are helped by beta receptor blocking agents. There is some evidence that an exercise program can gradually improve orthostatic tolerance.

What is the prognosis?

POTS may follow a relapsing-remitting course, in which symptoms come and go, for years. In most cases (approximately 80 percent), an individual with POTS improves to some degree and becomes functional, although some residual symptoms are common.

What research is being done?

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and other Institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct research related to POTS and support additional research through grants to major research institutions across the country. Much of this research focuses on finding better ways to prevent, treat, and ultimately cure disorders such as POTS. NINDS-funded researchers are investigating if low levels of the hormone aldosterone contribute to low blood volume in individuals with POTS, and if high levels of angiotensin II, a peptide that helps regulate blood volume, leads to decreased adrenal sensitivity.  Other NINDS-funded research is investigating the hypothesis that POTS is a syndrome of different subtypes, with different underlying mechanisms.  Additionally, the NINDS funds the Autonomic Rare Diseases Consortium to further understand disorders such as orthostatic hypotension and hopefully alter the course of disease.

NIH Patient Recruitment for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome Clinical Trials

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National Dysautonomia Research Foundation
P.O. Box 301
Red Wing, MN 55066-0301
http://www.ndrf.org External link
Tel: 651-327-0367
Fax: 651-267-0524
Dysautonomia Youth Network of America, Inc.
1301 Greengate Court
Waldorf, MD 20601
http://www.dynainc.org External link
Tel: 301-705-6995
Fax: 301-638-DYNA

Prepared by:
Office of Communications and Public Liaison
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD 20892

NINDS health-related material is provided for information purposes only and does not necessarily represent endorsement by or an official position of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency. Advice on the treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician who has examined that patient or is familiar with that patient’s medical history.

All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the NINDS or the NIH is appreciated.

Last Modified December 2, 2015

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What you can do to Strengthen your Vegus Nerve

Vegus Nerve
6 Ways to Instantly Stimulate Your Vagus Nerve to Relieve Inflammation, Depression, Migraines And More
September 1, 2016 6 Ways to Instantly Stimulate Your Vagus Nerve to Relieve Inflammation, Depression, Migraines And More2016-09-01T15:38:10+00:00 – Health – No Comment

This post first appeared on Darou Wellness. Go check out their amazingly informative blog about all things health related with advice from some of the leading Naturopathic Doctors in North America.

I read an article yesterday that has me extremely excited about the implications. The article is called “Hacking the Nervous System” by Gaia Vince (http://mosaicscience.com/story/hacking-nervous-system). In the article, the author describes the experience of a woman who suffered from severe, debilitating rheumatoid arthritis and her eventual treatment with a device which minimized inflammation by simply stimulating the vagus nerve. What this means, is that by activating the vagus nerve which works through the parasympathetic nervous system, we can greatly influence inflammation and the immune system. The role of the brain on body inflammation can be profound. If you suffer from digestive complaints, high blood pressure, depression or any inflammatory condition, please read on. Let me explain the possible implications step by step.


What is the vagus nerve?

First of all, the vagus nerve is the longest nerve in the body which originates in the brain as cranial nerve ten, travels down the from go the neck and then passes around the digestive system, liver, spleen, pancreas, heart and lungs. This nerve is a major player in the parasympathetic nervous system, which is the ‘rest and digest’ part (opposite to the sympathetic nervous system which is ‘fight of flight’).

To find out ways to strengthen your Vegus nerve fo to the following link http://www.healthylifeisbetter.com/6-ways-to-instantly-stimulate-your-vagus-nerve-to-relieve-inflammation-depression-migraines-and-more/

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Eight common warning signs of Gluten Intolerance!

Eight Common Warning Signs Of Gluten Intolerance
By Barbara Diamond

Sure, the word “gluten” has become somewhat of a buzzword lately — but gluten intolerance isn’t just a fad.

Despite what many people may think, gluten intolerance isn’t a food allergy and does not signify celiac disease. Rather, it’s a condition in your gut, and it can have a negative impact on one’s overall lifestyle and well-being.

According to Food Renegade, “undigested gluten proteins (prevalent in wheat and other grains) hang out in your intestines and are treated by your body like a foreign invader, irritating your gut and flattening the microvilli along the small intestine wall. Without those microvilli, you have considerably less surface area with which to absorb the nutrients from your food.”

We know that debilitating pain, vomiting, and diarrhea after eating are surefire signs of a serious gastrointestinal condition — but when looking at gluten intolerance, many of these universal signs may sound quite general and vague. However, those who remain undiagnosed may continue to eat gluten for the rest of their lives, putting themselves at risk for autoimmune and other diseases, along with a wide array of exhausting, frustrating, and uncomfortable symptoms.

Scroll down to see eight common signs of gluten intolerance, and please make sure to consult your doctor if you’re experiencing severe forms of any of the following symptoms.

Image Credit: DIY Network
1. Stomach Pain
1. Stomach Pain
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

You know what they say: Listen to your gut.

Digestive issues are perhaps the most obvious sign of gluten intolerance. After eating foods containing gluten, you may often experience gas, bloating, diarrhea, and constipation. According to Digestion Relief Center, eating foods that contain gluten can damage the lining of the small intestine, and can lead to poor absorption of minerals, vitamins, and most of the food you eat.
2. Dizziness
2. Dizziness
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

Many people with gluten intolerance experience brain fog, disorientation, and a strange feeling of being off-balance after consuming foods made with gluten — but they fail to connect the dots.

That frequent feeling of cloudiness isn’t normal, and by eliminating gluten from your diet, you may feel that cloud lifted. Some people have actually seen a decrease in vertigo attacks after cutting gluten from their diet.
3. Mood Swings
3. Mood Swings
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

Think about it… If your gut is unhappy with the foods you eat, then your brain will be, too. People with gluten intolerance often find themselves unexplainably irritable, anxious, or upset.

The New England Journal of Medicine listed 55 diseases caused or exacerbated by eating gluten, which included depression and anxiety.
4. Chronic Migraine
4. Chronic Migraine
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

Headaches are highly common for people with gluten intolerance. While it’s not associated with one specific type of headache, the pattern typically occurs within 30 to 60 minutes after eating.

Frequent migraines can also lead to blurry vision and pain around the eye sockets.
5. Itchy Skin
5. Itchy Skin
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

When your intestines have trouble processing gluten, they become inflamed, which can outwardly “reveal” itself through the skin. That’s why gluten sensitivity is often associated to skin conditions, like eczema and psoriasis. The immune system responds to an unhappy digestive system by creating antibodies that can cause dry, itchy skin.

These symptoms may result in many sleepless nights spent scratching at your knees, elbows, fingers, and/or shins.
6. Fibromyalgia
6. Fibromyalgia
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition that causes widespread pain in your muscles, ligaments, and tendons. It affects about 4 percent of the U.S. population, and mostly women.

According to many health professionals, avoiding gluten can alleviate fibromyalgia. As Medicine Net reports, rheumatology experts like Alex Shikhman, M.D., believe the diversity of dietary approaches may have less to do with the impact on fibromyalgia, and more to do with treating a secondary, possibly undiagnosed illness. “When patients are helped by a specific dietary measure, it is often because of the presence of a secondary condition that does have a recognized response to diet. And when you take care of that, you do get some relief from all the symptoms. You feel better overall.”

Makes sense, right?
7. Chronic Fatigue
7. Chronic Fatigue
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

It also makes total sense that if your body is out of whack and your mind is up and down, you’d also feel tired and exhausted. Even if you get eight to nine hours of sleep, you may still wake up feeling drained; this can signify a much bigger problem.

When your body is always inflamed and spending its energy on trying to deal with unwanted gluten proteins, then your energy will be spent much quicker and easier than normal.
8. Lactose Intolerance
8. Lactose Intolerance
LittleThings / Heeral Chhibber

Gluten and dairy intolerance have very similar symptoms, and sometimes the two go hand-in-hand. This is probably the most surprising sign of gluten intolerance, but it’s a big one.

If lactose is already a dietary issue for you, then chances are gluten is, too. There’s a specific type of sugar found in milk and other dairy products that can trigger digestive issues and add on to the already uncomfortable symptoms of gluten intolerance. Dairy foods are also a common trigger for acid reflux, which is also linked to gluten intolerance.

Please SHARE this important information with all those who may have been experiencing symptoms!

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